Top 50 Long Distance Hiking Trails In The USA (link)

Image Credit By Joe Parks from Berkeley, CA

Looking for a new hiking adventure this coming summer?

Try one of these 50 beautiful trails found all throughout the continental United States.

Granted, they’re a bit too long for me (by about a few thousand miles in some cases… just as my wife) but if you’re into extended scenic trips then I’m sure you’ll find a trail that’s right for and close by too…

Read the full article here

16 Remedies for Radiation Exposure (link)

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I didn’t realize there were so many potential helpful “remedies” for exposure to radiation. That said, they shouldn’t be considered equals either and, of course, it depends on what radioisotope you’ve been exposed to.

Regardless, radiation safety seems to boil down to (1) NOT being deficient in vitamins and minerals in order to avoid unwanted radioactive uptake and (2) prevention being the best medicine, in that, the less exposure to radioactive materials the better.

Last, while there are 16 potential remedies, I’d say only about half of them would be readily available to most folks. At the very least it’s good to know what may be useful to you…

“Some nuclear events are survivable.

Much depends on the type of event and your proximity to ground zero. Event possibilities range from dirty bombs that may distribute radiation over a small area, to nuclear accidents and nuclear weapon detonation that create large amounts of destruction and contamination. Your first goal is to avoid nuclear fallout, so you should take shelter immediately following a nuclear event. Then, you must mitigate the exposure that you do receive. Stay informed of local recommendations for your area, but be aware that your local news reporting may be designed to prevent mass panic, rather than give the best advice…”

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How To Flag And Tag Your Home For FEMA (link)

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As much as FEMA gets a bad wrap when SHTF, they are THE go-to agency when it comes to localized disaster response. With that in mind, it may be a good idea to know how to “speak their language” in order to facilitate said disaster response. Of course, there are other reasons to do so, such as keeping nosy people out of your business…

“We are from the government and we are here to help you! – these words inspire distrust in many Americans. I know because I have seen peoples’ reactions as I have uttered them trying to help them in emergencies.

Don’t want FEMA to kick your door in? Want to be a good citizen and do your part in an emergency? Download this article as a .pdf, print it and put it in a sheet protector and store it with supplies to tag and flag your home. It will help you a lot.

If you have seen pictures of the aftermath of a major disaster, you probably noticed cryptic markings on homes and buildings. Some are from insurance adjusters, some are made by search and rescue personnel and others are graffiti, warnings to looters or pleas for aid.

This article will help you understand search and rescue tagging methods and symbols and teach you how to flag your own home…”

Read the full article here

Bedroom Survival Kit (link)

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Considering we spend a significant amount of time in our bedrooms it behooves you to ensure you’re ready for whatever while you sleep. With that in mind, the following article offers quite a few items to include in your bedroom survival kit, everything from clothing, gear, and bug out bags to self-defense options, communications, and more…

“We spend about a third of our lives sleeping, so there is a good chance that you will awake to some sort of emergency at some point, if you haven’t already.

There you are, sound asleep until you are jolted awake by a bump in the night, a deafening siren, the rumbling of an earthquake or the shouts of a loved one. How prepared are you?

The purpose of the gear you have bedside should be to get you oriented and situationally aware and then get you to a safe room (often the master bedroom closet). This will delay attackers and provides hard cover as well as structural support against disaster to keep you safe and give you time to communicate and ready an appropriate response whatever emergency you are facing…”

Read the full article here

37 Emerging Diseases That Have Pandemic Potential (link)

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I honestly had little idea that there were so many diseases the CDC is keeping an eye on as a future pandemic threat and, believe it or not, the list doesn’t even include already established and widespread diseases such as Ebola and influenza!

As the following article later mentions, it wasn’t that long ago when the Plague (and more recently the 1918 flu pandemic) devastated populations both of which were well before travel by airplane was invented. Just imagine how quickly a pandemic could spread to YOUR city before the authorities even know what hit them.

If they’re not already, pandemics should be on your list of disasters to prepare for. Here’s the beginning of the article:

“A report released in December last year has highlighted 37 diseases that have pandemic potential. All of these infections are zoonoses – they infect animals but are able to jump the species barrier and infect animals. Their official title is zoonotic diseases. All 37 diseases would have dire impacts on human health across the globe. The report, run at the University of Edinburgh, was published in the Journal of Emerging Infectious Diseases

Prof Mark Woolhouse, one of the lead authors of the study had this to say: ‘Monitoring these infections should be prioritised because relatively minor changes in their ecology could lead to major changes in the threat they pose to public health’…”

Read the full article here

Prepping Is Different When You’re On Your Own (link)

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Prepping as if I’m living alone has never entered my mind. After all, I have a family to prepare for and so everything I do, everything I think about, ultimately is to keep them safe and fed.

But, if you’re on your own there are some things you’ll need to do differently and, sadly, it’s ALL up to you! Literally. There is nobody else to help if you’re tired or injured, nobody to bounce ideas off of, nobody to keep you sane when you’re losing your mind.

It’s a tough situation but one that can be prepped for, here’s some thoughts…

“So much information on prepping is geared toward prepping for a group of people, whether that is a family unit, a group of families, or a mutual assistance group (MAG) that goes beyond your family and neighborhood boundaries. But not everyone is prepping for a group.

There are people out there who are prepping for themselves and only themselves. They are on their own for whatever reason, be it that they choose to be or have found themselves in that situation. Regardless, prepping for a single person living alone is a bit different than prepping for a group. Let’s start with the advantages and disadvantages to prepping alone.

Advantages and Disadvantages
An individual enjoys some advantages, but also faces some disadvantages to prepping and surviving on their own. It is important to understand these, because if you do, you will be able to play to those advantages and make plans to minimize the disadvantages as much as possible…”

Read the full article here

The (Unexpected) Problems With FEMA Camps (video)

I’d suggest there are many potential problems with FEMA camps but some of these are new (and unexpected) to me; FYI, there’s some swearing involved so cover up little ears if need be. Of course, I couldn’t agree more with his statements that “FEMA camps aren’t a plan!” You really do need to make plans to care for yourself and your family now, while you still can do so…

A Knock At The Door, What Should You Do? (link)

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This is a good question, isn’t it? And one that few people expect to deal with but, sadly, it’s a potentially scary circumstance all American’s may face in their lifetime. Granted, the potential “threat” could be nothing at all but, then again, it could be your worst nightmare. What would you do? Here’s some thoughts from a law enforcement officer…

“A couple of years ago, when my mother still lived alone and before it became evident that her dementia was worsening, I took my wife and two daughters for an overnight visit. She lived about four hours from where we do and we often planned visits that allowed us to spend two days or more with her.

My mother liked to sleep on the couch in the living room. She had what some might consider an irrational fear of sleeping upstairs in the event that she had to get out of the house quickly or confront a situation in the middle of the night that might go unnoticed if she was sleeping on another floor. My wife and I had gone to bed in a bedroom upstairs, while my kids were sleeping in yet another bedroom on the second floor…”

Read the full article here