37 Emerging Diseases That Have Pandemic Potential (link)

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I honestly had little idea that there were so many diseases the CDC is keeping an eye on as a future pandemic threat and, believe it or not, the list doesn’t even include already established and widespread diseases such as Ebola and influenza!

As the following article later mentions, it wasn’t that long ago when the Plague (and more recently the 1918 flu pandemic) devastated populations both of which were well before travel by airplane was invented. Just imagine how quickly a pandemic could spread to YOUR city before the authorities even know what hit them.

If they’re not already, pandemics should be on your list of disasters to prepare for. Here’s the beginning of the article:

“A report released in December last year has highlighted 37 diseases that have pandemic potential. All of these infections are zoonoses – they infect animals but are able to jump the species barrier and infect animals. Their official title is zoonotic diseases. All 37 diseases would have dire impacts on human health across the globe. The report, run at the University of Edinburgh, was published in the Journal of Emerging Infectious Diseases

Prof Mark Woolhouse, one of the lead authors of the study had this to say: ‘Monitoring these infections should be prioritised because relatively minor changes in their ecology could lead to major changes in the threat they pose to public health’…”

Read the full article here

31 OTC Meds To Stockpile (link)

Unfortunately, my family is currently suffering through some illnesses and so this particular topic hits home. No doubt there are plenty of over-the-counter (OTC) medications to stockpile and the following article offers, well, 31 suggestions.

I believe most items I would have expected are covered, everything form pain relief to coughs and more. I did notice, however, one or two items that I would NOT consider OTC, such as QuikClot or FishMox (fish amoxicillin), so take the list as you will.

I didn’t notice, on the other hand, a few items I would have included such as lip balm, poision ivy scrub, gold bond foot powder, and whatnot but then again this list isn’t meant to be all-inclusive…

“Experienced preppers realize that when SHTF, one of the first locations looted and wiped out will be pharmacies and drugstores. What you may not realize is that in addition to those narcotics and prescription medications that many people covet, pretty much all of the over the counter medications (OTC) will be wiped out too. And in a SHTF scenario, no access to OTC meds not only makes life uncomfortable but it can be life threatening.

A great resource to purchase and have on hand is the Physician’s Desk Reference (PDR) Guide to Nonprescription medications. Keep in mind that I am not a medical doctor and cannot in any way recommend specific OTC meds for your individual situation. Please consult your physician for any possible contraindications or side effects with OTC meds that you choose to stockpile…”

Read the full article here

Ziploc Bag First Aid Kit (link)

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There’s no reason to get fancy with a first aid kit, a ziploc bag kit works just fine and, like the author says, has some advantages too.

Regarding the contents, I’d say he has the basics covered though I may have tossed in a few more OTC meds, such as Benadryl and perhaps something like Diotame (for things like diarrhea, nausea, indigestion) since they take up very little space. A pair of non-latex gloves would be good to include as well and also take up minimal space.

The beauty of a quick “grab and go” first aid kit like this is that it can be easily tailored to your specific situation, so if you need to include something more specific like prescription meds then you can do that no problem and then just remove them at the end of the day…

“I keep a ‘do-it-yourself’ First Aid Kit in a quart size Ziploc bag to fit nicely into any number of my various ‘bags’ (backpack, my Versipack’s, etc..).

Why do I do keep a First Aid Kit in a Ziploc?

While I do have a few other more substantial First Aid Kits, the minimalist (Ziploc) First Aid Kit works well for me because I can just slide it into a small space in my pack. Even if the pack is full, there’s a way to get it in there… Actually I just leave these Ziploc kits in the various bags so they’re always there.

There’s no extra bulk or weight of a hard container and there is the advantage of being able to see right into the Ziploc and what’s inside.

What First Aid items do I keep in a Ziploc bag?…”

Read the full article here

Dirty Bomb And Radiological Response Kit (link)

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Ever wonder what you should do to prepare for a dirty bomb or, Heaven-forbid, nuclear war? How about treatment of radiation exposure? If not, you should have some clue about what you can and should do to both treat the victim as well as to minimize exposure to yourself as well.

With that in mind, the following article offers quite a bit of good advice and plenty of links to further your knowledge about proper treatment of radiation exposure. It also explain what to expect during the days and weeks after exposure and, of course, offers several items to include in your treatment kit…

“…My kit started in 2008 before I became a prepper after attending a compulsory Canadian Government conference for a few days on the Medical Emergency Treatment for Exposures to Radiation (METER) . I am sure some of you have had more recent training and I’d love to read about USA and UK equivalent training. The course enrolment in 2008 was managers of trauma hospitals and emergency services and included a dirty bomb table top exercise. It was fascinating stuff and great speakers. I am including some more recent information from the Ontario Government Radiation Response Plan…”

Read the full article here

Dehydration Kills During Disasters – Signs And Symptoms to Know (video)

Dehydration is no joke and certainly possible during a disaster. Honestly, I’m surprised more people don’t have serious trouble from dehydration during emergency situations. Even when times are normal dehydration is easy wind up with. Just recently, in fact, my kid got rather sick for a night and started to show signs of dehydration. We started him off immediately with an oral rehydration solution. To make it more palatable, however, we ended up giving him some Recharge sports drinks. IMO, it’s never too early to start rehydration therapy if a person in losing fluids faster than they’re going in… know the symptoms!

How to Treat and Prevent Cholera (video)

Cholera is no joke, hasn’t been eradicated whatsoever, and WILL rear its ugly head post-SHTF. You had better know how to properly treat it should the need arise! In this video, ThePatriotNurse discusses what you can do and suggests you purchase antibiotics for your “sick fish” from here (use Aquarium6 discount code to save $10) as part of the treatment plan.

Beyond proper treatment it’s about prevention, specifically, ensuring you have clean water. To do so she recommends the Berkey Filter System (and I second that recommendation) here’s what she has to say about it…

How To Get Antibiotics Without A Prescription (video)

Just repeat the mantra: “my fish are sick, my fish are sick, my fish are sick” and you’ll be on the right track for sure, plus this video discusses a wonderful SHTF medical preparedness book, The Survival Medicine Handbook, which is written by two of my most favorite people, the Alton’s of DoomAndBloom.net. Trust me, you can’t go wrong with purchasing this book and following their advice…

How to Treat Tension Pneumothorax (video)

I’m glad I’m not an EMT! I can only imagine myself attempting to remember (let alone do) this if/when needed. I’d say the take away here is to call 9-1-1 should this ever be necessary. That said, if this is SHTF then you probably have no choice but to attempt. If you truly expect to do that then get appropriate training now…