The Bronc Box: Durable Gear Storage

This guy always seems to come up with neat new gear, and the bronc box is no exception. If you’re looking for a very durable, modular storage option for your weapons and gear, this box may be just the thing. They say it’s “build like a tank,” floats, can be customized, comes in different colors, and more…

Off Grid Tools Survival Axe Review

I was sent this Off Grid Tools Survival Axe with “31 features” in exchange for an honest review. And I told the representative that I’m not normally a fan of multi-use tools such as these… maybe I was wrong in this case.

I do want to point out that I feel advertising a tool has “31 features” to make it sound more useful is a bit misleading. As an example, nine of those features are somehow split among four separately sized hex head sockets built into the axe head. To me that’s only four “features” to list. Other features pull double-duty too, but there’s no reason to point out every single one. In my opinion, the survival axe has about a dozen clearly unique “features” to name.

Now, I’ll get off my soapbox and onto the interesting and useful aspects of the tool…

For starters, the packaging is something I pay attention to. If a tool is packaged well then odds are that it’s going to be built well. And, in this case, even though it’s packaged in plastic, the survival axe is clearly packaged well:

And comes with an easy-to-use sheath (a must for safety):

Inside the handle there’s a 6″ reciprocating saw blade that can be exposed by turning the small knob near the bottom of the handle:

The blade locks into position when being used; just push the blade a bit to the side and it can be rotated back into the handle for storage. That’s nice.

Before even using the axe, I decided to take the five screws out of the handle because I thought the axe might include extra blades… it does not.

Of course, the first thing I wanted to try out was the axe. And, so, I decided to split a bit of kindling. As you can see below, the Off Grid Tools Survival Axe is sitting next to my trusty Fiskars Hatchet which is what I normally use for splitting kindling fast:

Surprisingly, the Survival Axe performed very well. The blade was sharp and split kindling easily; just as easily as my Fiskars. In addition, the hammer on the backside of the Survival Axe came in handy when I needed to use a mallet get the axe head through tough spots in the firewood. For this purpose, I was pleased.

The next thing I tried was to drive a few different nails into a board with the hammer feature, and it worked well enough:

I then used the hammer claw feature to remove the nails and it worked just fine for the nails closer to the board, though I needed a bit of leverage for the longer nail:

Overall, the hammer and nail puller / claw worked well enough. It’s no replacement for an actual hammer, but it will get the job done.

I then wondered about the saw. And, although, it’s a full 6″ in length, I’d say the saw blade is virtually useless. In fact, I spent a good 30 seconds just trying to cut the end of the 2″x4″ until I tired out after getting almost nowhere:

Clearly, the teeth on this blade are NOT meant for cutting wood, so, I tried to cut a piece of cooper pipe:

It works, though, I wouldn’t want to have to use it often at all. If you can replace the blade with more aggressive teeth, then I would say it’s useful for potential survival purposes. Fortunately, it appears to be a typical reciprocating saw blade which means it can be easily swapped out with a more aggressive teeth pattern.

Most of the other features I didn’t really try, such as the hex head sockets, pry bar, or spanner wrench. I did try the box cutter and was underwhelmed as it was in an odd position to be truly useful and, to be honest, didn’t do a good job even when I could position the survival axe correctly.

And, although I wasn’t able to try a few of the likely more useful survival features yet, I do like the fact that it includes a gas shut-off wrench (I assume it’s non-sparking), seat belt cutter, and glass breaker.

Ultimately, I’m fairly pleased with the Off Grid Tools Survival Axe. The main components of the tool are useful (though you should replace the saw blade), it’s clearly made solidly, and includes a handful of additional features that could prove useful in the right situations (e.g., the seat belt cutter and glass breaker).

If interested, here’s a video about the various features too (not made by me):

GoSun Sport Portable Solar Cooker

I used to love to cook meals with my All American Sun Oven (like this one) and would post about it almost weekly for quite a while. Sadly, we moved to the Pacific Northwest and, well… those tall trees don’t make for advantageous solar cooking conditions, lol. Maybe one of these days I’ll dust it off again.

Anyway, that’s where a truly portable solar cooker, such as this GoSun Sport, would be a perfect fit. (I can attest that lugging my bulky sun oven around wasn’t fun by any means.)

And, while the price tag seemed a bit high at first, when I realized all that you could do with the GoSun Sport via the video below and recognizing how portable this particular sun oven truly is, then the GoSun Sport ProPack is actually quite reasonably priced.

Plus, the ProPack contains everything you need to cook and boil water while on the go, for in your car, at home, and so much more. If you don’t yet have a solar cooker then this one would be a good choice…

 

Save 31% on Collapsible Camping Lanterns (2-pk)

Image Credit

I got an email today from Amazon pointing out that, for a limited time, you can save 31% off a 2-pack of collapsible camping lanterns with promo code 312EA2RH.

Personally, I’ve got a few collapsible lanterns like these and have used them for at least two or three years now and I think they’re great! I wrote about one of them a few years back here, though these are a different brand.

Granted, such lanterns are not nearly as bright as a gas lantern, but they’re really good for being battery-powered since they’re LEDs which make them very efficient. In fact, I think they’re among the brightest battery-powered lanterns I own.

Besides that, they’re also super-lightweight, obviously compact (about the size of a can of vegetables when collapsed), safe for kids and adults because you won’t get burned (ask me how I know that’s a problem with gas lanterns), run on only a few AA batteries, and are nearly waterproof (let’s say quite water resistant).

Anyway, I couldn’t recommend them enough for the price at retail and with an additional 31% off right now… they’re a steal.

Grab a pack of two for your next camping trip or do what I do and keep a few placed around the house for when the power goes out.

Get Home Bag Real World Examples

Understanding the purpose behind a “get home bag” or “bug out bag” will help you decide what to include and why.

In this video, SensiblePrepper emphasizes the reasons why you should have such a bag ready at all times with several worthwhile examples.

He also briefly discusses items to include–medical items and self defense–especially the medical supplies which can be useful for helping others who have been injured after a disaster.

Clearly, there are many potential reasons why such a bag could be useful, including a personal SHTF situation, environmental disasters (e.g., tornadoes or blizzards), riots, and more.

Here’s why you need to have a get home bag or bug out bag ready…

Top 8 Portable Stoves for Survival

Image Credit

The following is quite an in-depth article detailing the eight best portable stoves on the market in 2018 and includes specifics on the different types of stoves available, why you should have one or two (or maybe all eight, lol), as well as key features you should look for in a portable stove.

The list includes classics like the Coleman white gas stoveJetboil flash, and Solo Stove, to name a few. Check out the article to see the rest…

Of course, they offer some solid recommendations, including

“A portable stove is a lightweight, compact stove. One light enough to transport from place to place with ease.

The critical word being – ease.

Sure, “technically” you can move your kitchen stove, but not with ease.

Portable stoves are the kind you can pick up, pack, and store in a vehicle or backpack without hassle.

For it to be genuinely”portable,” it must be small and lightweight. At least small enough for a petite human to carry it by themselves without throwing out their back.

Yet, just because they are small and light doesn’t mean they are not great at cooking food.

The best ones function as well as your standard kitchen stove.

You should be able to use a portable stove for cooking food or purifying water – in camp and on the go…”

Read the full article here

53 Essential Bug Out Bag Supplies: $0.99 Kindle Countdown Deal

I’ll keep this short and sweet, I’m running a $0.99 Kindle countdown deal on one of my more popular books, 53 Essential Bug Out Bag Supplies, and there’s less than 36 hours to until the price rises again.

So, if you’ve yet to take advantage and to grab the book, now’s the time to do so because the price goes up in about 33 hours as of this writing.

Built upon four tiers of gear and supplies, this book will show you precisely how to build a survival pack you can rely upon.

Besides the “53 essentials” we’ll also cover…

  • The Problem with Creating an “Ultimate” Bug Out Bag List
  • Choosing a Bag: Which Comes First, The Bag or The Gear?
  • 13 Unnecessary Items Most Go Bag Lists Include But Don’t Need

…and plenty more.

Don’t wait, grab the book while you can…

 

 

11 Best Tactics For Successful Predator Hunting

Predators are, by their very nature, more cunning, agile and fierce than prey animals, making them more difficult to hunt. The coyote, for example, is a fast, adaptable and agile creature capable of running up to 40 miles per hour. Apart from being difficult to hunt, predators are also dangerous to hunt.

However, predator hunting can be beneficial especially for whitetail deer hunters. A study by the Pennsylvania Game Commission revealed that 84% of deer fawns are killed by predators before hitting nine weeks of age. In South Carolina studies indicate the 100 % of fawns killed by predators were killed within nine weeks of birth. All these statistics indicate that predators have a negative impact on whitetail deer populations. Predator hunting is one way to even the playing field and ensure more whitetail deer make it to adulthood.

When going predator hunting, however, there are somethings you will need such as rubber hunting boots. Below I have compiled a list of simple tactics you can use to achieve success.

  1. Hunt in pairs

Most predators that roam our forests hunt at night. Unfortunately, our eyes do not work so well during the night. Animal eyes, on the other hand, have natural night vision meaning that we are at a natural disadvantage. Apart from having better eyesight, animals also have a stronger sense of smell. In fact, most animal’s sense of smell is thousands of times better than ours, which means that, yet again, we are at a natural disadvantage.

Fortunately, thanks to technology we have been able to make the playing field a little bit more even. For example, with e-callers you can trick animals into going where you want them. In my experience, however, I have found that it’s most beneficial to hunt in pairs.

Image Credit

Due to the natural disadvantage we have, it is fair to say that two pairs of eyes are better than one. When hunting with a friend you can cover a wider area. More importantly, one of you can be the caller while the other takes the shot. Using e-callers at night helps draw animals to a specific place. One hunter will be doing the calling drawing the animal to them while the other can station themselves 20 to 30 yards away. The animals will be attracted to the source of the sound and not to the shooter. Hunting in pairs makes already difficult work a lot easier.

  1. Take advantage of elevation

When hunting predators, a long-range rifle will come in handy. Unlike prey animals, which you can shoot from close range, predators are agile and cunning. So, the best way is to scope a predator from long range. Since our eyes are not designed for long-range viewing, a rifle scope is a must. To improve your chances, it is recommended you use some kind of elevation because, from an elevated position, you are able to see further.

Image Credit

Also, from an elevated position, your calls go further. Camouflage is important when scoping an area from an elevated position as well. Thus, dressing in full camo is advisable. This is to ensure you blend in perfectly with your surroundings. To maximize your chances only move when it’s time to take the shot.

  1. Call after the shot

As I have already stated most predatory animals hunt at night. Therefore, the best time to hunt is early in the morning and late in the evening when visibility is low. After taking a shot do not make the mistake of leaving your position before calling again after five or so minutes. The reason is that another animal might be in the vicinity. You might take down one predator only to walk right into the clutches of another. Calling again after a shot is a precautionary measure.

  1. Use the right tools

The tools you use to hunt predators will determine the success of your hunt. This includes scopes, firearms and even the ammo you use. When it comes to firearms, the AR 10 and AR 15 platforms are the most popular among predator hunters. The reason being is that these two firearms allow for quick follow up shots. Needless to say, the rifle you use should be in good condition. Regular firearm maintenance is crucial to your hunting success.

Predator hunters cannot seem to agree on which cartridges to use when hunting coyotes, bears, wolves and other predators. In my opinion, it all depends on what you are shooting at. A 22-250 is enough to take down a wolf from 150 yards. The 22-250 is preferred for wolves and coyote since it does not leave large exit holes which may damage the fur. As such, this cartridge is ideal if you are hunting for fur. On the other hand, a .308 Winchester is ideal for bear hunting.

Apart from a firearm and ammo, you will also need a reliable rifle scope. Finding the best 22lr scopes for predator hunting is not always easy. Ideally, you should go for medium to long range scopes. Medium range is from 75-150 yards while the long range is from 100 yards to 500 yards. A scope with a 3x to 9x magnification is suited for medium range shooting while one with a magnification of between 4x and 12x is designed for long-range shots.

In my experience, the best 22lr scopes include the Nikon Prostaff Rimfire and Simmon 3-9X 32 mm riflescope. On the other hand, the best scope for AR 10 is one with a 3-9x magnification. Also, you can go for a scope with a 4X-12X magnification for long range shooting.

Shooting sticks will also come in handy when you want to shoot accurately. I prefer shooting sticks over bipods because they can be used on a wide variety of terrain whereas bipods are best suited for flat terrains, but not for hilly or rolling terrains. Taller tripods are useful for nighttime applications and can be shortened for daytime use. If you prefer to hunt sitting down, I recommend the Harris S25C bipod, which allows for side to side movement.

  1. Check waterways

Animals need water to survive. With that in mind, waterways such as streams and rivers, attract many animals both predators and prey. Early in the morning, you are likely to find animal tracks on the banks of streams and rivers. This is when most predator animals are active and searching for prey. Since prey animals are found near waterways, predators are never far off behind. Setting up a stand near a stream or river will increase your chances of a successful hunt.

  1. Observe wind patterns

Predators have a very good sense of smell as probably already know. And thanks to the wind predators can sniff you out from a very long way out. This means that the wind can be your worst enemy if you are not careful. It is not advisable to have the wind at your back.

According to science humans shed hundreds of thousands of skin particles per hour, these tiny pieces of skin get carried by the wind and catch the attention of animals. Avoid this by moving so that you’re downwind or, at least, to the side.

  1. Do not be near vehicles

Often, we drive to our preferred hunting locations. Vehicles improve mobility but can hinder you from having a successful hunt. It is recommended that you move 100 yards away from your vehicle before you start hunting. Vehicles and other mechanical devices produce a scent that can easily be detected by predators.

As if that is not bad enough, predatory animals tend to shy away from vehicles. In fact, most animals will run away from anything that looks like a vehicle. Moreover, driving over dusty or gravel roads produce sounds that can be detected by animals.

Unfortunately, ditching your vehicle is not enough. The shoes you wear can also ruin your chances of success. There are many types of hunting boots out there. Rubber boots are ideal for hunting predators since they can withstand different conditions. The boots you select for your hunting needs should have an outer rubber sole to minimize noise when walking.

  1. Pay attention to weather changes

Although the American black bear is one of the few bear species that does not hibernate during winter, they are not active during extreme weather conditions. During rainy and snowy days predators tend to be less active than on moderately temperate days. Predators also tend to be less active during extremely hot days.

It is important to take note of weather changes and how predators react to them. During winter, for instance, go hunting when the sun comes up after a snowfall. Days with moderate temperatures are also great to go out hunting. Predators are likely to go out hunting all day long after a storm as well.

  1. Use traps

Hunting predatory animals require experience. If you are not an experienced hunter, the best thing to do is use traps, scents, and calls. Strategically placed scent lures can attract a predator in no time. If you are poor at making calls you can buy pre-recorded calls. Trapping can make things a lot easier.

The problem is that not all animals can be easily caught using the same trap. Thus, you must customize your trap to fit the animal you want to hunt. With fox hunting, for example, one of the best traps to use is the #2 Montgomery Dogless Coil Spring since they lie very flat and are easy to hide.

  1. Be stealthy

Stealth is an art that is needed when predator hunting. Due to animals having heightened senses, it is important that you learn the art of being stealthy. The way you walk through brush can often make a world of difference. When predatory animals sense movement or human odor they can do either one of two things: run or attack. If an animal decides to do the former, then you will be in serious danger.

Walking stealthily is not enough, though, as you also must rid yourself of any scent. Buying scent blockers is one way of protecting yourself during a hunt. In addition, you should invest in camouflage. The camo you select should help conceal you and your weapons. A combination of scent blockers and camouflage can help achieve maximum stealth.

  1. Use the right decoy

The use of decoys is prevalent among predator hunters, and for good reasons. Decoys and artificial callers increase a hunter’s chances of going home with a kill. That being said, it is important to know what kind of decoy to use. The period between late February and March is breeding season for coyotes. In most instances, you will find coyotes traveling in twos to protect denning areas from unwanted visitors. Using a coyote decoy is an effective way to lure coyotes. Due to them being territorial coyotes tend to be confrontational during the breeding season. And there is nothing more confrontational than a rival coyote.

Whitetail deer breeding season is usually from late April to May. And, as I already explained, coyotes and other predators love whitetail deer fawns. Thus, when hunting coyotes, use a fawn in distress call. Anything that sounds like an animal in distress will attract predators. As spring comes to an end and summer begins predators will most likely be found under shade and near rivers.

Conclusion

We’ve outlined nearly a dozen actions you can take to increase your chances of bagging yourself a predator. However, it is important to note that predator hunting is a wide topic to cover and not easy. As such, it will require a bit more practice as compared to whitetail deer or turkey hunting. Nevertheless, when you use the tactics outlined above, few predators will stand a chance.

Author Bio

Glen Artis is the founder of OutdoorEver. A proud hunter, writer and weapon enthusiast, He has a deep respect for the animals that roam our forests and for the environment. His passion is sharing what he knows with those who are new to hunting or those who want to know.

53 Essential Bug Out Bag Supplies Book FREE on Amazon

Bug Out Bag Book

Would you believe I’m now releasing my third survival book on Amazon? And I’m happy to say this one is a good one, covering a topic many preppers struggle over.

But, don’t worry, I’ve got you covered with my latest Kindle book, 53 Essential Bug Out Bag Supplies, and it’s currently FREE on Amazon Kindle today through Friday.

All I ever ask of folks who take advantage of my free giveaways is that they give it a quick rating or review on Amazon when they’re finished.

Built upon four tiers of gear and supplies, this book will show you precisely how to build a survival pack you can rely upon.

Realize, however, that this book tackles the topic a bit differently than most bug out bag books. In fact, if you live anywhere near a city or town and have no expectation of actually evacuating into the wilderness, then it’s time get your bug out bag right with these 53 essentials you won’t want to be without.

We’ll also discuss:

  • The Problem with Creating an “Ultimate” Bug Out Bag List
  • Choosing a Bag: Which Comes First, The Bag or The Gear?
  • 13 Unnecessary Items Most Lists Include but You Won’t Need

Grab yourself a copy while you can and discover precisely how to build a “go bag” you can rely upon…