Why A Mylar “Survival” Space Blanket Is Worth Having In Your Pack

I’m generally VERY against the cheap [easyazon_link identifier=”B01LZN0KGB” locale=”US” tag=”rethinksurviv-20″]mylar “survival” space blankets[/easyazon_link] mostly because there are better option and, honestly, people don’t use them right. I’m a much bigger fan of the [easyazon_link identifier=”B005ILFFTM” locale=”US” tag=”rethinksurviv-20″]SOL Heatsheets[/easyazon_link] (two person version) which are discussed in the following video. That said, any such blanket has limitations and must be used appropriately as shown below…

Here’s One Time You May Not Be Testing Your Smoke Alarms

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So I was downstairs in the basement this morning getting a fire going and I was having a hard time of it. Reason being is that this particular fireplace has a 90-degree bend in the flue which makes getting it going a bit challenging and takes some patience.

I wasn’t feeling very patient today and so I just “went for it” using kindling that was a bit too large and more than I should have started with, knowing full-well that I would probably smoke out the basement as a result. And, of course, I did have to open the doors to air the basement out while I was getting the fire going.

The thing is that I wondered why the smoke alarm nearest the fireplace didn’t go off because I was sure that it would have. And I knew for a fact that the batteries were good because I just recently replaced them a month or two ago.

Clearly, I wondered what was wrong, so I took the smoke alarm down and pressed the test button… nothing. I then opened the battery cover, removed the 9-volt, and my problem was obvious: I’d put the battery in backwards… literally 180-degrees the wrong way!

No doubt THAT smoke alarm was going to do me no good should I have ever needed it. Fortunately, I probably go overboard with my smoke alarms throughout the house, so I was likely covered by another–relatively nearby–smoke alarm but, regardless, I made an easily preventable mistake that I don’t believe I’d ever made before. And it was a mistake that could have cost lives.

Now I get to go check the rest of the smoke alarm batteries just to be sure they’re all installed correctly and, of course, I should be pressing the “test” button to ensure each of them works as expected… especially after I replace the batteries.

The Mors Kochanski Super Shelter

Here’s Mors himself discussing his “super shelter” design (based off the igloo) for wilderness survival. Inside the video he shows you a few different shelter, including one really BIG one! You can get the book he recommends, The Two Kilogram Survival Kit Field Manual, to explain the idea even more, if you like…

Rocket Stove Fuel Alternatives

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If you’re “into” survival at all then you’re likely very familiar with rocket stoves… they’re awesome! And they can be fashioned out of all sorts of items, from sheet metal and tin cans to masonry bricks and even earthen materials.

The thing is that I’ve ALWAYS used sticks and twigs to fuel them; however, as the following post explains: “…when a hurricane brushes by my coast and dumps 4-10 inches of rain, there are no dry branches or twigs to gather, light and cook dinner with!”

Clearly, you’ll need an alternative rocket fuel in that case. Here’s a few ideas…

A rocket stove can burn just about anything, including your furniture if need be!

Like any cooking appliance, it needs fuel of some sort. The Rocket Stove is no exception. For me, when a hurricane brushes by my coast and dumps 4-10 inches of rain, there are no dry branches or twigs to gather, light and cook dinner with! I found it difficult to long-term store dry twigs and small branches for its’ fuel, until this week. I found that the Preppers favorite long-term storage container, the 5-gallon bucket, works perfectly!

Wood Fuel for the Rocket Stove:

Here are two buckets, one has split wood in it (about ½ to ¾ inch square by 12-13 inches long) ready to use. The other bucket has scrap 2×4’s and 2×6’s in it, I had this wood on my fireplace wood pile and because of rains, it is too wet to easily split with a hand ax so I’ll get to it in a couple weeks. The nice thing about using 5-gallon bucket for the wood storage is just snap a lid on it and it is neat, dry, bug-free, and clean in your closet or pantry storage…”

Read the full article here

Top 8 Portable Stoves for Survival

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The following is quite an in-depth article detailing the eight best portable stoves on the market in 2018 and includes specifics on the different types of stoves available, why you should have one or two (or maybe all eight, lol), as well as key features you should look for in a portable stove.

The list includes classics like the Coleman stoveJetboil flash, and Solo stove, to name a few. Check out the article to see the rest…

Of course, they offer some solid recommendations, including

“A portable stove is a lightweight, compact stove. One light enough to transport from place to place with ease.

The critical word being – ease.

Sure, “technically” you can move your kitchen stove, but not with ease.

Portable stoves are the kind you can pick up, pack, and store in a vehicle or backpack without hassle.

For it to be genuinely”portable,” it must be small and lightweight. At least small enough for a petite human to carry it by themselves without throwing out their back.

Yet, just because they are small and light doesn’t mean they are not great at cooking food.

The best ones function as well as your standard kitchen stove.

You should be able to use a portable stove for cooking food or purifying water – in camp and on the go…”

Read the full article here

Matches On Steroids – UCO Sweetfire Strikeable Fire Starters

I just love it when survival is made easier, and these UCO Sweetfire Strikeable Fire Starters do just that since they’re basically a weatherproof match and fire starter built into one. The best part is that they’ll burn for several minutes each, plenty of time to get a good fire going…