Egg Storage Experiment – Week 1 Results

Last Monday I posted about my interest in storing eggs with mineral oil for long term storage. FYI, I have one carton of eggs stored with mineral oil and one carton as a control group (no mineral oil) both of which are setting out on my countertop. Well, week one is over (I actually started this experiment a week ago on Friday night) and here are the results…

This is the control egg (no mineral oil):

egg1-wk1

And this is the mineral oil egg:

egg2-wk1

As you can see, neither egg floated (floating is bad) so that suggests they are still good. Just to be sure, I cracked both open, sniffed, and laid them out on a plate:

eggs-wk1

So, which one is which? I would have known the difference but for the record, the egg on the left is the mineral oil egg. Had I not already eaten eggs that morning I might have given it a shot eating them… will have to try again next week.

Product Spotlight – Supreme 90 Day DVD

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Your fitness is among the most important areas of preparedness that you can directly control. This Surpeme 90 Day program is essentially a knock-off to the popular P90X but A LOT less expensive. I’ve got both and thus far enjoy this program.

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My Failed Passive Solar Heater Experiment (And What I Learned From It)

passive-solar-0Like most bloggers, I want to be able to show you cool things, tell you everything is wonderful, and especially share my successes. I was optimistically expected to be able to do just that today but it’s not the case. You see, it all went wrong when I decided to do my own thing and not follow what someone had proven already worked. Some people have the knack of improvisation, I do not.

The problem was that I neither wanted to spend the money nor the time to make something as permanent as these videos showed; in fact, while I’ve seen some very cool YouTube videos about passive solar heaters, some of these guys really put serious effort into their designs! I just wanted to prove it worked… now I’ve got myself wondering.

Anyway, here’s the build I came up with (I’ll explain some lessons learned later and even link to one of the videos I liked at the very end):

Steps (follows the pictures in order):

  1. Find a nice large box that was heading for the recycle bin. In the future, find a much smaller box because this needed entirely too many cans (it’s about 3′ x 3′).
  2. Fill the box full of soda cans (96 total) which doesn’t sound like much but, trust me, it was a lot of work getting that many cans together!
  3. Mark the top and bottom of the box before removing the cans and the guess (better yet, measure) where to cut holes for air to enter and exit.
  4. This is what one side (I think it’s the top) looks like when the holes are cut out. Be sure to cut them a little less than the diameter of the can lips (maybe an inch wide).
  5. Put holes in the bottom of all cans. I started off using a large screwdriver but I wanted to the hole a bit larger so I opted for a dandelion digger instead. A few taps with a hammer and then round it out a bit. BE CAREFUL: you’ll now have exposed metal which can cut you VERY easily.
  6. This is what a typical hole looks like. Not pretty but I figured it would be functional.
  7. The holes in the soda cans didn’t exactly line up with the holes in the cardboard box but I figured I wasn’t sending an astronaut into space so no big deal.
  8. Paint the cans black. What you don’t see is my *brilliant* idea to simply caulk the tops and bottoms of the cans together while they were laying in the box. It’s works but wasn’t the best use of caulking.
  9. I decided that it needed to be held together a bit better, especially where the holes in the cans met the box so I used strategic placement of packaging tape to close the gaps (which sort of worked).
  10. Cover with clear plastic and tape down. Sadly, the 3.5 mil thick plastic I used was not nearly as clear as I had remembered so it wasn’t letting much sunlight through. (Note: this step was not shown in the gallery but can be seen completed in the thumbnail picture at the start of the post.)

I was going to take some temperature readings but could neither find an appropriate thermometer for the task nor the desire because the amount of heat was minimal at best and, even worse, the amount of airflow was lackluster at best. So, I didn’t even bother.

Lessons Learned (generally follows above):

  1. I should have started like everyone else with a wood frame for sturdiness. Cardboard can get wet, is flimsy, and didn’t allow for precise alignment.
  2. Since I just wanted to prove the concept, I could have used half the number of cans and still got a good idea of what to do.
  3. I should have taken my time to properly mark and cut the holes so that I could later seal the cans directly to the frame for less airflow lost.
  4. I really need a few good metal working tools. The video below shows how the guy put three nice holes in the bottom of each can which is a lot cleaner and probably allows for quite a bit more airflow. He also cut off the tops of each can, which I did not; I really figured this would be too much removed but I guess not.
  5. I should have also choose to completely seal the tops and bottoms of cans together (as well as the cans to the frame) so that no air would be lost during heating. This was a big mistake.
  6. Cover the heater with something more durable and definitely 100% clear! Another huge mistake here. I really don’t think the “clear” plastic I used helped my cause whatsoever.

THE MOST IMPORTANT LESSON?

If you’re going to bother to take the time, put forth the effort, and spend the money (yes I did spend a few dollars)… then DO IT LIKE YOU MEAN IT! Or, better yet, build it like I intended to keep and use it. 🙂

Don’t make my mistakes. Follow what somebody has already proven works…

YouTube Video that was useful (there are plenty of others):

An Often Missed Prep: Your Home Inventory

inventory-listOne area of preparedness that I don’t think we preppers take as seriously as we should is inventorying our household possessions for an emergency situation. I’m not talking about organizing your supplies (I’ve written about that in the past here). This post is purely about “what happens if it’s all lost and now I need to file an insurance claim?”

It’s a seemingly simple act, no doubt. List everything you own or, at least, everything of significant value. This should include, furniture, electronics, prepping equipment (of course!), jewelry, dishes, firearms, precious metals, books and dvds, clothing, yard and garden tools… you get the idea. I also recognize that there may be some things you don’t want to list so it’s entirely up to you what you include.

The problem occurs when you go to file a claim and your insurance agent wants you to PROVE IT. Can you? Do you have receipts, a record, pictures, video recordings, etc?

There are actually quite a few tools you can use to better inventory your stuff and I’ve tried plenty of them, from Excel files to online databases to writing it down, pictures, video, and I can’t remember what else.

What have I found that works the best for me and didn’t cost an arm and a leg? I actually do two things.

Action 1

The first thing is to list in some fashion (I like spreadsheets) the more expensive things we own, including those items mentioned at the start, furniture, appliances, firearms, etc. I won’t bother to list each and every DVD we own but, rather, simply estimate the number and combined cost. It’s just not worth the effort. The same can be said for lumping things like kitchen dishes together… I just estimate. However, taking a moment to list our couch that cost a few paychecks is worth it to me. The same can be said for the television, stereo equipment, etc. It is quite possible to go overboard when listing what you own and spend way too much time here. That’s not the point. Hit the major things, lump what you can together, and leave the rest to the video tape (discussed later).

What to include?

Usually the more details the better. They like to see make, model, serial number (if available), date purchased, and cost. Receipts are greatly appreciated. One thing I’m told they like to do to you is to give you the actual cash value of your possessions which deducts deprecation and, therefore, gives you less money. What you WANT is replacement value coverage which attempts to give you the money needed to replace what you’ve lost in today’s dollars. The moral of this story is to CHECK YOUR POLICY for what type of coverage you have and accept nothing less than replacement value. Regardless, you could be very surprised at how much stuff you actually own. Therefore, ensure your coverage is actually enough to replace everything you own!

Action 2

The second thing I do (about once a year) is to take my video camera and go room-by-room briefly narrating what inside as best as I can because we’re always bringing in new items and even discarding old possessions. The more up-to-date this video is the better off you’ll be if/when you need to deal with your insurance company. You don’t need to get fancy here. Just do a good pan of each room, open drawers and cupboards, and mention important specifics as you deem necessary. You know the old saying that “a picture is worth a thousand words” then a video has got to be worth ten thousand. If you can’t do a video then take plenty of pictures.

Additional Steps

Once you have everything chronicled in multiple ways, it’s best to get this information off-site. After all, the whole point is to have something to fall back on in the event of a catastrophic situation. Send this information to a trusted family or friend or perhaps a bank box is a good choice. Even if you choose to keep this information in a fire safe on your property, please choose to make a copy and send it somewhere else as you never know what could happen to your primary list/video if on site.

And, remember to occasionally update your information. Write it on your schedule, such as when you replace your smoke alarm batteries or at each New Year or whatever works for you. You don’t have to completely re-do everything; even a short five minute video update of your possessions is better than nothing. Of course, be sure to date each tape so you know when it was last done.

Welcome to Liberty Coin And Precious Metals (and about a fun contest giveaway!)

liberty-cpm-small-2I wanted to welcome Liberty Coin and Precious Metals to the growing group of reThinkSurvival sponsors (they had been a sponsor but we had some mis-communication recently and their ad was removed for a few weeks). Anyway, they’re back and doing some fun stuff, including giving you some nice deals on your precious metal purchases!

In particular, I wanted to point out a cool contest that I wasn’t even aware they ran, which is to guess as close as possible to the closing spot price of silver at the end of the month with the winner receiving a 10 ounce bar of .999+ fine silver bar! You know the best part? They do it every month. 🙂

Click on the link above to go directly to the contest. I gave my guess, now it’s your turn.

Camping Survival Paracord 7% Discount Code

Wish I knew about this when I bought my paracord from Camping Survival but it seems they’re offering a 7% discount off their already ridiculously low prices! Just use the code “overstock” when checking out. Here’s a link to their paracord stock: http://www.campingsurvival.com/us-made-military-paracord.html. Not sure how long the code is good for.

Welcome Full Moon Survival (Another Neat Website to Buy Emergency Preps)

full-moon-adI keep finding cool websites to buy products and the best part is that they end up reThinkSurvival sponsors! Today, we welcome Full Moon Survival.

According to their About page, “Full Moon Survival is one of the largest suppliers of Emergency Survival Kits, Emergency Supplies, Emergency Food, Food Storage, Water Storage, Water Filtration and information on surviving natural and man-made disasters.”

A few other points to note:

  • Family owned and operated
  • Free shipping on all orders over $100
  • New products added weekly
  • One of the largest selections of emergency products on the internet

I can’t remember what I was searching for at the time but when I found Full Moon Survival I immediately wound up looking at their huge selection of food storage, especially #10 cans. In fact, they sell a wide range of Harvest Farms (a company I hadn’t tried yet) and Mountain House products as well as others.

They also sell garden seeds, water storage and purification products, emergency kits, first aid supplies, books, and plenty more. Take a few moments and see what they have to offer for you!

Review of PRI-G Fuel Stabilizer (Hands-Down the Best Available)

I had an opportunity this week to get my hands on a bottle of PRI-G fuel stabilizer, something I had been meaning to do for quite some time. For many, many years I’ve always used Stabil as my fuel stabilizer because it’s what’s been available locally. Sadly, PRI-G is difficult to find at times but you can certainly buy it online (such as on Amazon).

For a long time I’ve heard nothing but good things about PRI-G (or PRI-D for diesel fuel). From various reviews to expert opinions, I had to try it! Honestly, the only way I know to review it is to compare PRI-G to what I currently use, that being Stabil. The *best* way to review them would be to treat fuel and wait for years on end but I didn’t want to wait THAT long so following is the next best thing…

Let’s start with cost. An 16-ounce bottle of Stabil on Amazon costs a little over $6, while a 16-ounce bottle of PRI-G on Amazon costs about $32. A little math says that a bottle of PRI-G is over 5x as costly as a bottle of Stabil… so why in the world should I buy it?

Well, a single 16-ounce bottle of Stabil can treat 40 gallons of gasoline whereas a similar bottle of PRI-G can treat 256 gallons of gasoline, over 6x as much gasoline! For the cost conscious among us, that’s a good reason why.

Of course, PRI-G makes a variety of claims that I cannot vouch for but have no reason not to believe, including:

  • ideal for e-10 gasoline
  • provides greater power
  • improves fuel efficiency
  • prevents damaging deposits
  • contains no alcohol

As for me, they had me at “treats almost 6x as much gasoline” as compared to Stabil. I’ve also heard (I believe) from Steven Harris of Solar1234.com that PRI-G can be used to restore gasoline that has “gone bad” though I haven’t tried to verify that claim either.

I can say that I’m ready to give it a shot. In fact, I’ve decided to use my current gasoline storage up over the next week or two and treat it exclusively with PRI-G instead from now on… and suggest you do as well.

Your Respones to My Poll Request

First, thank you to those who took the time to answer my poll request. By and large, you don’t want me to change anything, so I won’t! A few things to note:

  1. Daily YouTube, Quick Reference, and the 99 Capacities posts will not be changed because you would prefer I did not.
  2. You would prefer I include answers to the “quiz of the week” on the actual post rather than my Facebook page, so I will do so from now on.
  3. You rather enjoy the “How To” Knowledge Base so I will try to include links a bit more often but it really depends on other blogs linking interesting and new posts.
  4. Other pages (e.g., Survival Blog Best Posts, The Survival Podcast Favorites, Top 50 Survival Sites RSS Feeds, etc) will continue to be updated as I can.
  5. I’m still considering doing my own “top 50” or something similar because I don’t necessarily agree with the the referenced site’s recommendations as some sites listed are not blogs, not updated regularly, or simply negative. Give me a bit of encouragement and I may just do it!

Did I miss anything? Let me know.