Rocket Stove Fuel Alternatives

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If you’re “into” survival at all then you’re likely very familiar with rocket stoves… they’re awesome! And they can be fashioned out of all sorts of items, from sheet metal and tin cans to masonry bricks and even earthen materials.

The thing is that I’ve ALWAYS used sticks and twigs to fuel them; however, as the following post explains: “…when a hurricane brushes by my coast and dumps 4-10 inches of rain, there are no dry branches or twigs to gather, light and cook dinner with!”

Clearly, you’ll need an alternative rocket fuel in that case. Here’s a few ideas…

A rocket stove can burn just about anything, including your furniture if need be!

Like any cooking appliance, it needs fuel of some sort. The Rocket Stove is no exception. For me, when a hurricane brushes by my coast and dumps 4-10 inches of rain, there are no dry branches or twigs to gather, light and cook dinner with! I found it difficult to long-term store dry twigs and small branches for its’ fuel, until this week. I found that the Preppers favorite long-term storage container, the 5-gallon bucket, works perfectly!

Wood Fuel for the Rocket Stove:

Here are two buckets, one has split wood in it (about ½ to ¾ inch square by 12-13 inches long) ready to use. The other bucket has scrap 2×4’s and 2×6’s in it, I had this wood on my fireplace wood pile and because of rains, it is too wet to easily split with a hand ax so I’ll get to it in a couple weeks. The nice thing about using 5-gallon bucket for the wood storage is just snap a lid on it and it is neat, dry, bug-free, and clean in your closet or pantry storage…”

Read the full article here

3 Ways to Preserve Food WITHOUT Canning

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Occasionally, I rant about how much I despise canning foods… it’s always been a pain, in my opinion, and quite messy. That said, I know it can be a great way to put a lot of food if you’re willing to do so, and I’m just not THAT willing, lol.

Fortunately, there are plenty of other ways to stockpile food without refrigeration or canning, and the following article discusses three of them: fermentation, dry curing (meats), and dehydrating.

Personally, I’ve gotten into fermentation in the past few years and, for the most part, it’s really easy to do. I’ve only done a bit of curing and I used to do a lot of dehydrating, though, I’ve slowed on that once I really discovered freeze-dried foods.

Regardless, they’ll all great ways to preserve many healthy foods for the long term and I would strongly encourage you to try you hand at one or more of these methods if you’ve never done so.

Here’s the first part of the article:

“Canned food is so prevalent today that it’s hard to imagine life without it. When you have extra produce that you want to preserve, most people will tell you to can it.

But, what happens when you don’t have the equipment you need for proper canning? What if you run out of flat lids and can’t go to the store for more? Or if you can’t start a fire and keep it going long enough to properly heat and process your jars?

Depending on what happens, canning extra food may not always be possible. You need some alternatives.

Canning was thought to be invented by Nicolas Appert back in 1809, when he was looking for a way to preserve food for the French military. The invention of the mason jar in 1858 helped spread canning’s popularity, as did other inventions throughout history.

But prior to these events, people preserved food without canning. They knew they had to grow or harvest enough food each growing season to last the winter. Their very survival depended on putting up food that they could safely eat months later…”

Read the full article here

The Grid-Down MultiMachine 10-in-1 All-Purpose Machine Tool

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Have you ever heard of the MultiMachine before? I hadn’t until I read this article earlier this morning.

Apparently, it’s a DIY open source project intended for developing countries “…that can be built by a semi-skilled mechanic with just common hand tools… electricity can be replaced with ‘elbow grease’ and the necessary material can come from discarded vehicle parts.”

That sounds interesting and promising.

According to the aforementioned website, this off-grid machine tool can be used to:

  • build and repair irrigation pumps and farm implements
  • make and repair water pumps and water-well drilling rigs
  • build steel-rolling-and-bending machines for making cook stoves
  • make cart axles and rebuild vehicle parts

…and more.

Like I said, the plans are all open source and can be downloaded as a PDF file or viewed as an HTML document, if you prefer.

What you May NOT know About Preserving Eggs

I did this experiment myself years ago now and, surprisingly, it worked out rather well, even after four months of only being preserved with mineral oil.

In the video she says the coated eggs can last up to nine months, I’ve seen others say a year, and my experiment lasted 18 weeks because that’s how many eggs I had to experiment with. 🙂

Anyway, she offers some additional valuable tips that I wish I knew when I tried my own hand at this, though I do disagree a bit about not using store-bought eggs because my experiments showed there was a clear difference between the control eggs (those that were left uncoated) and those that did get coated with mineral oil after several weeks, if I remember right.

Here’s the video…

11 Best Tactics For Successful Predator Hunting

Predators are, by their very nature, more cunning, agile and fierce than prey animals, making them more difficult to hunt. The coyote, for example, is a fast, adaptable and agile creature capable of running up to 40 miles per hour. Apart from being difficult to hunt, predators are also dangerous to hunt.

However, predator hunting can be beneficial especially for whitetail deer hunters. A study by the Pennsylvania Game Commission revealed that 84% of deer fawns are killed by predators before hitting nine weeks of age. In South Carolina studies indicate the 100 % of fawns killed by predators were killed within nine weeks of birth. All these statistics indicate that predators have a negative impact on whitetail deer populations. Predator hunting is one way to even the playing field and ensure more whitetail deer make it to adulthood.

When going predator hunting, however, there are somethings you will need such as rubber hunting boots. Below I have compiled a list of simple tactics you can use to achieve success.

  1. Hunt in pairs

Most predators that roam our forests hunt at night. Unfortunately, our eyes do not work so well during the night. Animal eyes, on the other hand, have natural night vision meaning that we are at a natural disadvantage. Apart from having better eyesight, animals also have a stronger sense of smell. In fact, most animal’s sense of smell is thousands of times better than ours, which means that, yet again, we are at a natural disadvantage.

Fortunately, thanks to technology we have been able to make the playing field a little bit more even. For example, with e-callers you can trick animals into going where you want them. In my experience, however, I have found that it’s most beneficial to hunt in pairs.

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Due to the natural disadvantage we have, it is fair to say that two pairs of eyes are better than one. When hunting with a friend you can cover a wider area. More importantly, one of you can be the caller while the other takes the shot. Using e-callers at night helps draw animals to a specific place. One hunter will be doing the calling drawing the animal to them while the other can station themselves 20 to 30 yards away. The animals will be attracted to the source of the sound and not to the shooter. Hunting in pairs makes already difficult work a lot easier.

  1. Take advantage of elevation

When hunting predators, a long-range rifle will come in handy. Unlike prey animals, which you can shoot from close range, predators are agile and cunning. So, the best way is to scope a predator from long range. Since our eyes are not designed for long-range viewing, a rifle scope is a must. To improve your chances, it is recommended you use some kind of elevation because, from an elevated position, you are able to see further.

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Also, from an elevated position, your calls go further. Camouflage is important when scoping an area from an elevated position as well. Thus, dressing in full camo is advisable. This is to ensure you blend in perfectly with your surroundings. To maximize your chances only move when it’s time to take the shot.

  1. Call after the shot

As I have already stated most predatory animals hunt at night. Therefore, the best time to hunt is early in the morning and late in the evening when visibility is low. After taking a shot do not make the mistake of leaving your position before calling again after five or so minutes. The reason is that another animal might be in the vicinity. You might take down one predator only to walk right into the clutches of another. Calling again after a shot is a precautionary measure.

  1. Use the right tools

The tools you use to hunt predators will determine the success of your hunt. This includes scopes, firearms and even the ammo you use. When it comes to firearms, the AR 10 and AR 15 platforms are the most popular among predator hunters. The reason being is that these two firearms allow for quick follow up shots. Needless to say, the rifle you use should be in good condition. Regular firearm maintenance is crucial to your hunting success.

Predator hunters cannot seem to agree on which cartridges to use when hunting coyotes, bears, wolves and other predators. In my opinion, it all depends on what you are shooting at. A 22-250 is enough to take down a wolf from 150 yards. The 22-250 is preferred for wolves and coyote since it does not leave large exit holes which may damage the fur. As such, this cartridge is ideal if you are hunting for fur. On the other hand, a .308 Winchester is ideal for bear hunting.

Apart from a firearm and ammo, you will also need a reliable rifle scope. Finding the best 22lr scopes for predator hunting is not always easy. Ideally, you should go for medium to long range scopes. Medium range is from 75-150 yards while the long range is from 100 yards to 500 yards. A scope with a 3x to 9x magnification is suited for medium range shooting while one with a magnification of between 4x and 12x is designed for long-range shots.

In my experience, the best 22lr scopes include the Nikon Prostaff Rimfire and Simmon 3-9X 32 mm riflescope. On the other hand, the best scope for AR 10 is one with a 3-9x magnification. Also, you can go for a scope with a 4X-12X magnification for long range shooting.

Shooting sticks will also come in handy when you want to shoot accurately. I prefer shooting sticks over bipods because they can be used on a wide variety of terrain whereas bipods are best suited for flat terrains, but not for hilly or rolling terrains. Taller tripods are useful for nighttime applications and can be shortened for daytime use. If you prefer to hunt sitting down, I recommend the Harris S25C bipod, which allows for side to side movement.

  1. Check waterways

Animals need water to survive. With that in mind, waterways such as streams and rivers, attract many animals both predators and prey. Early in the morning, you are likely to find animal tracks on the banks of streams and rivers. This is when most predator animals are active and searching for prey. Since prey animals are found near waterways, predators are never far off behind. Setting up a stand near a stream or river will increase your chances of a successful hunt.

  1. Observe wind patterns

Predators have a very good sense of smell as probably already know. And thanks to the wind predators can sniff you out from a very long way out. This means that the wind can be your worst enemy if you are not careful. It is not advisable to have the wind at your back.

According to science humans shed hundreds of thousands of skin particles per hour, these tiny pieces of skin get carried by the wind and catch the attention of animals. Avoid this by moving so that you’re downwind or, at least, to the side.

  1. Do not be near vehicles

Often, we drive to our preferred hunting locations. Vehicles improve mobility but can hinder you from having a successful hunt. It is recommended that you move 100 yards away from your vehicle before you start hunting. Vehicles and other mechanical devices produce a scent that can easily be detected by predators.

As if that is not bad enough, predatory animals tend to shy away from vehicles. In fact, most animals will run away from anything that looks like a vehicle. Moreover, driving over dusty or gravel roads produce sounds that can be detected by animals.

Unfortunately, ditching your vehicle is not enough. The shoes you wear can also ruin your chances of success. There are many types of hunting boots out there. Rubber boots are ideal for hunting predators since they can withstand different conditions. The boots you select for your hunting needs should have an outer rubber sole to minimize noise when walking.

  1. Pay attention to weather changes

Although the American black bear is one of the few bear species that does not hibernate during winter, they are not active during extreme weather conditions. During rainy and snowy days predators tend to be less active than on moderately temperate days. Predators also tend to be less active during extremely hot days.

It is important to take note of weather changes and how predators react to them. During winter, for instance, go hunting when the sun comes up after a snowfall. Days with moderate temperatures are also great to go out hunting. Predators are likely to go out hunting all day long after a storm as well.

  1. Use traps

Hunting predatory animals require experience. If you are not an experienced hunter, the best thing to do is use traps, scents, and calls. Strategically placed scent lures can attract a predator in no time. If you are poor at making calls you can buy pre-recorded calls. Trapping can make things a lot easier.

The problem is that not all animals can be easily caught using the same trap. Thus, you must customize your trap to fit the animal you want to hunt. With fox hunting, for example, one of the best traps to use is the #2 Montgomery Dogless Coil Spring since they lie very flat and are easy to hide.

  1. Be stealthy

Stealth is an art that is needed when predator hunting. Due to animals having heightened senses, it is important that you learn the art of being stealthy. The way you walk through brush can often make a world of difference. When predatory animals sense movement or human odor they can do either one of two things: run or attack. If an animal decides to do the former, then you will be in serious danger.

Walking stealthily is not enough, though, as you also must rid yourself of any scent. Buying scent blockers is one way of protecting yourself during a hunt. In addition, you should invest in camouflage. The camo you select should help conceal you and your weapons. A combination of scent blockers and camouflage can help achieve maximum stealth.

  1. Use the right decoy

The use of decoys is prevalent among predator hunters, and for good reasons. Decoys and artificial callers increase a hunter’s chances of going home with a kill. That being said, it is important to know what kind of decoy to use. The period between late February and March is breeding season for coyotes. In most instances, you will find coyotes traveling in twos to protect denning areas from unwanted visitors. Using a coyote decoy is an effective way to lure coyotes. Due to them being territorial coyotes tend to be confrontational during the breeding season. And there is nothing more confrontational than a rival coyote.

Whitetail deer breeding season is usually from late April to May. And, as I already explained, coyotes and other predators love whitetail deer fawns. Thus, when hunting coyotes, use a fawn in distress call. Anything that sounds like an animal in distress will attract predators. As spring comes to an end and summer begins predators will most likely be found under shade and near rivers.

Conclusion

We’ve outlined nearly a dozen actions you can take to increase your chances of bagging yourself a predator. However, it is important to note that predator hunting is a wide topic to cover and not easy. As such, it will require a bit more practice as compared to whitetail deer or turkey hunting. Nevertheless, when you use the tactics outlined above, few predators will stand a chance.

Author Bio

Glen Artis is the founder of OutdoorEver. A proud hunter, writer and weapon enthusiast, He has a deep respect for the animals that roam our forests and for the environment. His passion is sharing what he knows with those who are new to hunting or those who want to know.

49 Expert Tips, Tricks, and Advice for New, Teen Drivers Book

I just realized that I forgot to mention that my latest book, How to Drive Safely: 49 Expert Tips, Tricks, and Advice for New, Teen Drivers, is currently available and FREE for the next two or three days on Amazon Kindle (through Thursday, I believe).

I know it’s not quite a “survival” book that most people expect, but I’d say it’s one of the most important books anyone could read to keep them safe in their daily lives, especially for new drivers… like my oldest son is about to be. Besides, even seasoned drivers could use the refresher; I know I learned a few statistics that started me and it reinforced quite a few safe driving habits I’d been lax about in recent decades, lol.

Here’s What’s Covered Inside…

  • The Most Dangerous Driving Times, Days, and Situations (some of these might surprise you)
  • 5 Actions You Should Always Do Before Driving Off (how spending 15 seconds now can save your life)
  • Why Not Speeding is Much More Than Avoiding Speeding Tickets (and why it doesn’t actually save time)
  • What NOT to Do While Driving (you’d be surprised at how much safer you’ll be)
  • 11 More Common-Sense Safety Tips to Know (these could keep you the safest of all)
  • Why Semi-Trucks and Other Large Vehicles Deserve Special Attention (hint: they always win car accidents)
  • How to Really Get Your Car Ready for the Road (most people ignore these to their detriment)

Why You Must Start Educating Them Now…

Young adults think they know everything, they think they’re invincible, and they think that nothing bad will ever happen to them. You and I both know that’s not true. You simply MUST prepare your new, teen driver to be as safe as possible while you still have the opportunity to do so… here’s how to educate your teen to drive safely on the road right from the start.

(And, like I said, I’m sure you’ll appreciate reading it too.)

Get the Book Now So You Stay Safe

It’s simple to do, just scroll down and click the “Buy Now” button and you’ll get this knowledge instantly delivered to your fingertips only moments from now.

Once on the Amazon.com page, just click the “Buy now with 1-click” option to get the book for free on your Kindle…

Thank you and stay safe out there.

P.S. All I ever ask when I give my books away for free is that, when you’re finished, give it a quick rating or review on Amazon and choose to share it with your friends and family before the free deal expires so they have this valuable knowledge too.

How to Prevent the Fastest Growing Crime in America

Identity Theft Book

Did you know that, according to the FBI, “Identity theft is one of the fastest growing crimes in the U.S., claiming more than 10 million victims a year.”

And guess what? That statement was from 2004!

According to the U.S. Department of Justice more than 17 million Americans were victims of identity theft in 2014.

Obviously, identity theft is on the rise and only getting worse as we continue to move our lives and financial transactions to a digital existence.

Fortunately, you can take 7 critical steps right now to prevent this from happening to you, and it’s all laid out in my new book, Your Identity Theft Protection Game Plan, which is currently free in Kindle format on Amazon, but only for the next few days.

Here’s what’s covered inside:

  • Why your mailbox is the riskiest non-technological point for identity theft (and what to do about it)
  • Why identity thieves call trash day, “cash day” (and how papers that most people never take a second look at help criminals steal from you)
  • How to quickly and easily minimize junk mail and credit card offers to limit your mail theft exposure
  • 4 ways to minimize your identity exposure (and one surefire way to stop criminals from accessing your credit files)
  • Why antivirus software isn’t enough to combat online identity theft (and how smart devices are becoming the new “battleground” for your data)
  • How using public Wi-Fi could be the most dangerous thing you do all day (and one simple way to virtually guarantee your safety)
  • Why using variations of the same password is a horrible mistake (and a surprisingly easy way to protect your most sensitive online data)
  • How RFID “No Swipe” technology allows thieves to steal your credit/debit card information without your card ever leaving your pocket (and how to protect against it)

…and plenty more. Plus, we’ll cover 7 additional actions to minimize your overall exposure as well as what to do should you become a victim of identity theft.

Save yourself from years of heartache… take the right steps now, right now to protect your identity before it’s too late.

Remember, the book is free for a limited time, just click the “Buy Now” button (it may say “Buy now with 1-Click”) and you’ll be that much closer to protecting yourself from becoming the next victim of identity theft.

All I ask of you is that you choose to leave the book a quick rating (it takes only a few seconds) or an actual review when you’re done.

Get the Book Now…

DIY Chimney Sweep – Gardus Sooteater Rotary Chimney Cleaning System Review

Recently, I’ve been wanting to clean my own fireplace flue rather than having to pay somebody to do it. And, yes, I know there’s something to be said for having a qualified chimney sweep inspect it once a year, which I still plan to do, but for peace of mind until then I figured it couldn’t hurt to do it myself. As such, I started looking for DIY chimney sweeps.

The only problem, however, is that I REALLY don’t like climbing on my roof, especially since it has a rather steep pitch, but mostly because I’ve inherited my dad’s general fear of heights… you should see me trying to climb on my rooftop, it takes me at least ten minutes to do as I slowly shimmy my way way up there, lol. And getting down is even worse!

Anyway, rather than getting a traditional chimney sweep with a metal brush, the kind where I’d have to be on top of my roof, I found this Gardus Sooteater Rotary Chimney Cleaning System which allows me to keep my feet safely on the ground and to clean my flue from the bottom up:

The contents include the following (as shown in the photo below):

  1. Chimney sweep head
  2. 6 three-foot flexible rods
  3. Plastic sheet (to cover the fireplace opening)
  4. Manual
  5. Drill bit adapter and wrench

I should note that I was a little concerned about the “flexible” rods because they didn’t seem that flexible to me at first glance, but I was wrong… they’re fairly flexible and I had no trouble with them. Time to get to work.

Now, here’s what the inside of the flue looked like before attempting my chimney sweep (after about a cord of wood). Clearly, there is some buildup, but it doesn’t look horrible compared to some photos I found online. Truth be told, I don’t really know what “normal” is so my opinion here doesn’t count for much:

The first thing I had to do was to trim the rotary head to be slightly larger than my flue diameter. I measured my flue diameter to be 5.5″ and, so, I trimmed the head to be about 6″ in diameter according to the directions:

I was a bit concerned about trimming the head to be THAT short because I felt like it may not clean the flue well enough if, for example, the head slid along one side of the flue pipe as I worked up the flue. I read online, however, that as it speeds up the head will tend to center itself and properly clean all of the flue. In addition, if I’d chosen to NOT trim the head to fit as directed that it may not clean well enough because it wouldn’t properly scrape the flue wall. Ultimately, I took the internet’s word for it and trimmed the head as directed.

Next, I cut out some of the plastic sheeting to fit my fireplace and taped it in place with some duct tape, though I left the bottom open so I could fit the chimney sweep inside, like so:

The directions, however, stated I should have poked a hole in the center of the plastic and taped the entire sheet in place; by now I figured I knew more than the manufacturer and, so, I ignored that recommendation… hopefully that wouldn’t come back to haunt me.

I quickly started to work my way up the flue and it was surprisingly easy to do. Here’s what it looked like after I’d added a few extensions:

I was done in only a few minutes, but I did slow down as I got near the top because I was worried about knocking off or otherwise ruining my chimney cap. Here’s what I got out of the flue pipe:

It was a good several scoops of what I’m assuming is first stage creosote because it was black, light, and fluffy. And, just out of curiosity, I wondered what my chimney flue looked like when I was done:

As you might be able to tell, half of the flue looked like it was cleaned well. The other half (where the red arrow points) didn’t look very cleaned, which is something I’d worried about when I cut the head strings so short. From what I could tell, however, it did seem to clean all of the flue pipe further up, at least, from what I could see. It was really just the bottom few feet where it didn’t clean because the head never centered itself. Oh, well, I think that next time I’ll try to replace the head strings and cut them a bit longer or really focus on the bottom section.

Ultimately, I’d say my DIY chimney sweep  was a success. I was able to use my old 14.4 volt cordless drill (even though I was worried about not having enough torque) and I didn’t make a mess either by not fully sealing the door opening with plastic and tape… which also means I get to stay married for a little while longer. 🙂

One thing I do like about this system is that apparently I can replace the head strings on my own with weed-eater string (it just needs to be the right diameter) which means I can do this on my own again in the future, and very inexpensively.

I also think that next time I might try to work my way from the top down (but still keep my feet on the ground) as I saw this guy do here:

Overall, I’m fairly pleased with the Gardus Sooteater Rotary Chimney Cleaning System. It allowed me to clean out my chimney flue without having to climb on my rooftop (which I would have dreaded), was easy to do, can be reused, and didn’t cost much.

That said, I’m still probably going to have a qualified chimney sweep come out before next season starts and check it out just to be sure.