The Ultimate Gas Mask Guide for Preppers

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My new friend, Rusty, at TruePrepper.com (go check them out, they’re doing good things over there) recently posted a very good article on gas masks titled, The Ultimate Gas Mask Guide for Preppers, which really opened my eyes to the importance of having gas masks on hand for my family again. Take the time to understand all about gas masks now…

“Gas masks may seem stereotypical for prepping (just look at our logo and author biographies) but they are an important piece of protective equipment for a variety of situations. Sticklers may insist on calling them ‘protective masks’ since they can protect you from more than just gas. A gas mask has already saved my life against chemical weapons and biological threats. It gives a fighting chance against some radiation exposure as well. I taught classes on gas masks to thousands of military personnel for several years. I have even worn one while exposed to live chemical warfare agents and can assure you that they work. In this guide, we will go over:

  • 7 Important Fast Facts about Gas Masks
  • Types of Gas Masks
  • My Experience with Different Masks
  • Gas Mask Rating Types
  • Where to Buy a Gas Mask
  • TruePrepper Suggested Gas Mask
  • How to Make Sure a Gas Mask Fits
  • What Kits to Include a Gas Mask In
  • Troubleshooting and Maintaining Gas Masks
  • Additional Gear Needed With a Gas Mask
  • Drawbacks of Gas Masks

You should have some solid takeaways from this ultimate gas mask guide and be confident in selecting and maintaining a mask perfect for you and your family…”

Read the full article here

How to Make a Faraday Cage in 4 Easy Steps

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“If you’ve been in the prepper world for long, you’ve probably read some horrifying books about what can happen after a disaster called an EMP. And if you’ve done that, you know you need to protect vulnerable electronics. Today, we’ll talk about how to make a Faraday cage to do just that. Don’t worry – you won’t need a degree in physics to do this successfully.

First, let’s start off with a few important things to know.

What is an EMP?

EMP is short for electromagnetic pulse. It is a short burst of electromagnetic radiation that could come if a nuclear detonation occurred at very high altitude above us.

When a nuclear explosion occurs in space above a target, three types of electromagnetic pulses follow: E1, E2, and E3. An E1 pulse involves high-energy gamma rays colliding with air molecules nearly 20 miles above, then raining down electrons that get pulled in by Earth’s natural magnetic field. An E2 pulse comes from high-energy neutrons that get fired in every direction, and an E3 pulse occurs due to the size of the nuclear fireball itself affecting the Earth’s magnetic field. As nuclear physicist Dr. Yousaf Butt explains, these pulses affect everything in line of sight of the nuclear blast. For example, a blast at 60 miles up can affect a 700-mile radius on Earth…”

Read the full article here

You Know What’s Worse Than Smoke Alarms Going Off For No Reason In The Middle Of The Night?

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Last night at about 1:45 am, which is technically today, our interconnected house smoke alarms went off for no reason. You know, the smoke alarms where if one goes off, they all go off. Yeah, those. I make this distinction because we also have a handful of independent, battery-powered smoke alarms throughout the house and none of those went off.

Anyway, I never do well when I’m startled out of bed in the middle of the night and last night was no exception; it took me a few seconds to realize what was going on, but once I did my wife and I bolted out of the room and started looking for the trouble… followed very closely by a now shaking dog who NEVER appreciates it when the smoke alarms sound.

Once I realized that there wasn’t a problem on the main level, I quickly ran downstairs fearing that the kids had maybe left the space heater on and it caught something on fire. But, when I checked, I saw no fire and smelled no smoke. So, I quickly moved to my boy’s room (they share a room)… nothing. Finally, I checked on my niece’s room… nothing again.

My oldest son managed to rouse himself from his slumber enough to ask me what was going on. I didn’t know and told him to go back to bed.

The smoke alarms were still going off at this time and, realizing there wasn’t an immediate threat, I started to attempt to silence the smoke alarms but they stopped blaring at about the same time. I then choose to do one last check around the house just to be sure. Still nothing.

Confused, I tried to lay back down and wouldn’t you know it… the smoke alarms went off again about 20 minute later!

Less concerned that there was an actual fire, I decided to silence the alarms initially because they were driving me nuts, and then I set off to check the house yet again. Nothing. I’m not disappointed, mind you, just confused.

This morning I did a quick search to try and figure out why I was so rudely awoke in the middle of the night for no apparent reason, and I happened upon this article which gave me a few possibilities besides the obvious ones, including:

  • Humidity / steam. Apparently smoke alarms can’t distinguish between smoke particles and high moisture content which I think is odd, though probably not my problem because it’s wintertime and not super humid in the house.
  • Chemical odors. This would be strong odors, such as ammonia or paint fumes. I wasn’t using any strong chemicals or painting in the middle of the night, so this probably isn’t the issue either.
  • Dust. I think I knew that dust could set off a smoke alarm but, again, there’s no reason for heavy amounts of dust to have been in the air.
  • Insects. I had no idea that small bugs could crawl into a smoke alarm and set one off. And, if I had to pick one odd reason, this would be it because we do have an inordinate amount of creepy-crawlies around and inside our house.

Now, let me get to the entire point of this post…

You Know What’s Worse Than Smoke Alarms Going Off For No Reason In The Middle Of The Night?

Besides being started half-to-death, what’s worse is that my youngest son (who’s now twelve years old) didn’t even budge when the alarms went off!

And it’s not like they went off for only a few seconds; the first time they went off they had to be sounding for at least a minute or two. That should clearly be long enough to have woke him up at least to wonder what was going on, but apparently not.

You know, when my kids were much younger, I did worry that they wouldn’t wake up when a smoke alarm went off because I’d seen it happen. After all, young kids can seemingly sleep through anything. I figured, however, that my now much older kids would surely wake up. I was wrong.

In fact, I just asked him this morning if he’d heard the smoke alarm last night and he responded, “No. The smoke alarms went off last night?”

And that’s what I’m now still afraid of.

28 Powerful Home Security Solutions Book Now FREE on Amazon

Home Security Book

Did you know that roughly 10,000 home burglaries are committed each day here in America? That’s well over 3,000,000 per year!

Fortunately, I can help you to avoid becoming a victim with my sixth book, 28 Powerful Home Security Solutions, which is now available into Thursday for FREE on Amazon in Kindle format.

In return for offering the book free, I only request you leave a rating or review when you’re finished reading the book… it both helps to keep me motivated writing and let’s other potential readers know what YOU think.

Now, there’s plenty you can do to stop burglars from targeting you and your possessions… and to gain the upper hand in this never-ending battle.

While there’s no way to 100% ensure that your home won’t be targeted and possibly robbed, we can, however, employ many strategies to both dissuade would-be thieves and to thwart their efforts if they do choose your home.

Taking the actions discussed in this book WILL greatly sway the odds in your favor to be sure.

Inside this book, you’ll:

  • Get to know the enemy (who these people are and what they really want)
  • Understand how they plan their heist (you might be surprised at how fast they act)
  • Discover which factors deter burglars (some things aren’t so obvious), as well as
  • Uncover 25 vital actions you should take to stop them dead in their tracks (what are you missing?)

You’ll also discover the three most effective security measures you can take that all but guarantee a thief will move on and leave your home alone for good.

If you want to know how to truly stop a burglar from targeting you and your possessions, then this book will show you how.

Note: Some people get confused about how to purchase a Kindle book because Amazon offers multiple choices. Just choose the “Buy now with 1-click” option and, so long as the book is offered for free (such as during this promotional period), you shouldn’t have to pay for it. If you choose the “kindle unlimited” option, then you’re signing up for their monthly subscription which you may or may not want.

7 Prepper Lessons Learned in Afghanistan

This was an interesting video I ran into earlier today on one man’s experience while working in Afghanishtan in 2003. You can skip to about the 2:35 mark to get to the heart of his talk, if you like, but I’d say the entire video is worth the time, especially if you want to know what life might be like after a major disaster, and what to do about it. He discusses situational awareness, blending in, avoiding confrontation, and more…

How to Prevent the Fastest Growing Crime in America

Identity Theft Book

Did you know that, according to the FBI, “Identity theft is one of the fastest growing crimes in the U.S., claiming more than 10 million victims a year.”

And guess what? That statement was from 2004!

According to the U.S. Department of Justice more than 17 million Americans were victims of identity theft in 2014.

Obviously, identity theft is on the rise and only getting worse as we continue to move our lives and financial transactions to a digital existence.

Fortunately, you can take 7 critical steps right now to prevent this from happening to you, and it’s all laid out in my new book, Your Identity Theft Protection Game Plan, which is currently free in Kindle format on Amazon, but only for the next few days.

Here’s what’s covered inside:

  • Why your mailbox is the riskiest non-technological point for identity theft (and what to do about it)
  • Why identity thieves call trash day, “cash day” (and how papers that most people never take a second look at help criminals steal from you)
  • How to quickly and easily minimize junk mail and credit card offers to limit your mail theft exposure
  • 4 ways to minimize your identity exposure (and one surefire way to stop criminals from accessing your credit files)
  • Why antivirus software isn’t enough to combat online identity theft (and how smart devices are becoming the new “battleground” for your data)
  • How using public Wi-Fi could be the most dangerous thing you do all day (and one simple way to virtually guarantee your safety)
  • Why using variations of the same password is a horrible mistake (and a surprisingly easy way to protect your most sensitive online data)
  • How RFID “No Swipe” technology allows thieves to steal your credit/debit card information without your card ever leaving your pocket (and how to protect against it)

…and plenty more. Plus, we’ll cover 7 additional actions to minimize your overall exposure as well as what to do should you become a victim of identity theft.

Save yourself from years of heartache… take the right steps now, right now to protect your identity before it’s too late.

Remember, the book is free for a limited time, just click the “Buy Now” button (it may say “Buy now with 1-Click”) and you’ll be that much closer to protecting yourself from becoming the next victim of identity theft.

All I ask of you is that you choose to leave the book a quick rating (it takes only a few seconds) or an actual review when you’re done.

Get the Book Now…

DIY Chimney Sweep – Gardus Sooteater Rotary Chimney Cleaning System Review

Recently, I’ve been wanting to clean my own fireplace flue rather than having to pay somebody to do it. And, yes, I know there’s something to be said for having a qualified chimney sweep inspect it once a year, which I still plan to do, but for peace of mind until then I figured it couldn’t hurt to do it myself. As such, I started looking for DIY chimney sweeps.

The only problem, however, is that I REALLY don’t like climbing on my roof, especially since it has a rather steep pitch, but mostly because I’ve inherited my dad’s general fear of heights… you should see me trying to climb on my rooftop, it takes me at least ten minutes to do as I slowly shimmy my way way up there, lol. And getting down is even worse!

Anyway, rather than getting a traditional chimney sweep with a metal brush, the kind where I’d have to be on top of my roof, I found this Gardus Sooteater Rotary Chimney Cleaning System which allows me to keep my feet safely on the ground and to clean my flue from the bottom up:

The contents include the following (as shown in the photo below):

  1. Chimney sweep head
  2. 6 three-foot flexible rods
  3. Plastic sheet (to cover the fireplace opening)
  4. Manual
  5. Drill bit adapter and wrench

I should note that I was a little concerned about the “flexible” rods because they didn’t seem that flexible to me at first glance, but I was wrong… they’re fairly flexible and I had no trouble with them. Time to get to work.

Now, here’s what the inside of the flue looked like before attempting my chimney sweep (after about a cord of wood). Clearly, there is some buildup, but it doesn’t look horrible compared to some photos I found online. Truth be told, I don’t really know what “normal” is so my opinion here doesn’t count for much:

The first thing I had to do was to trim the rotary head to be slightly larger than my flue diameter. I measured my flue diameter to be 5.5″ and, so, I trimmed the head to be about 6″ in diameter according to the directions:

I was a bit concerned about trimming the head to be THAT short because I felt like it may not clean the flue well enough if, for example, the head slid along one side of the flue pipe as I worked up the flue. I read online, however, that as it speeds up the head will tend to center itself and properly clean all of the flue. In addition, if I’d chosen to NOT trim the head to fit as directed that it may not clean well enough because it wouldn’t properly scrape the flue wall. Ultimately, I took the internet’s word for it and trimmed the head as directed.

Next, I cut out some of the plastic sheeting to fit my fireplace and taped it in place with some duct tape, though I left the bottom open so I could fit the chimney sweep inside, like so:

The directions, however, stated I should have poked a hole in the center of the plastic and taped the entire sheet in place; by now I figured I knew more than the manufacturer and, so, I ignored that recommendation… hopefully that wouldn’t come back to haunt me.

I quickly started to work my way up the flue and it was surprisingly easy to do. Here’s what it looked like after I’d added a few extensions:

I was done in only a few minutes, but I did slow down as I got near the top because I was worried about knocking off or otherwise ruining my chimney cap. Here’s what I got out of the flue pipe:

It was a good several scoops of what I’m assuming is first stage creosote because it was black, light, and fluffy. And, just out of curiosity, I wondered what my chimney flue looked like when I was done:

As you might be able to tell, half of the flue looked like it was cleaned well. The other half (where the red arrow points) didn’t look very cleaned, which is something I’d worried about when I cut the head strings so short. From what I could tell, however, it did seem to clean all of the flue pipe further up, at least, from what I could see. It was really just the bottom few feet where it didn’t clean because the head never centered itself. Oh, well, I think that next time I’ll try to replace the head strings and cut them a bit longer or really focus on the bottom section.

Ultimately, I’d say my DIY chimney sweep  was a success. I was able to use my old 14.4 volt cordless drill (even though I was worried about not having enough torque) and I didn’t make a mess either by not fully sealing the door opening with plastic and tape… which also means I get to stay married for a little while longer. 🙂

One thing I do like about this system is that apparently I can replace the head strings on my own with weed-eater string (it just needs to be the right diameter) which means I can do this on my own again in the future, and very inexpensively.

I also think that next time I might try to work my way from the top down (but still keep my feet on the ground) as I saw this guy do here:

Overall, I’m fairly pleased with the Gardus Sooteater Rotary Chimney Cleaning System. It allowed me to clean out my chimney flue without having to climb on my rooftop (which I would have dreaded), was easy to do, can be reused, and didn’t cost much.

That said, I’m still probably going to have a qualified chimney sweep come out before next season starts and check it out just to be sure.

10 Best Rifles for Elk Hunting in 2017

Any serious gun fanatic might tell you that all rifles are awesome, but not all rifles are awesome for every type of shooting and hunting.

When it comes to elk hunting, you want a rifle that is durable but light enough to carry up the mountain with ease. But you also want it to be able to hold large caliber rounds with minimal recoil and handle well when firing off-hand shots in the event of a surprise game sighting.

To put it another way, you want a versatile weapon that packs a punch and can offer long range accuracy without being a burden.

Most of us want an affordable rifle that is damn near indestructible and can fell an eight-hundred pound beast at four-hundred yards or more. We also want an attractive firearm that looks as good as it shoots. Choosing the right rifle for the job is one of the joys of hunting.

If you think this sounds like a dream gun that can’t possibly exist, you’d be pretty wrong. The rifles on this list come fairly close to meeting all of the aforementioned requirements.

  • Browning A-Bolt Composite Stalker
  • Browning BLR Lightweight ’81
  • Kimber Model 84M Classic
  • Marlin Model 338 MXLR
  • Marlin Model 1895G Guide Gun
  • Remington Model 673 Guide Rifle
  • Ruger No. 1S Medium Sporter
  • Weatherby Mark V Deluxe
  • Weatherby Vanguard Deluxe
  • Winchester M70 Super Grade

Browning A-Bolt Composite Stalker

This bolt-action model comes in a number of long and short action calibers, but when it comes to elk hunting you can’t go wrong with the .338 Winchester mag. It’s a great option for hunters who are on the move and performs like a boss at 100 yards, making it a monster for bagging does.

The most economical of Browning models, the Stalker retails for $820, but you can usually find a lightly used one on sale for around $700.

With black synthetic straight stock, a fiberglass graphite composite grip and black rubber butt pad, the Stalker is a real beaut. Personally, I like to load it with Black Hills Gold hunting ammo when I take mine out for a bit of proper stalking.

Browning BLR Lightweight ’81

No list would be complete without at least two Browning models. They’re a leader in the field and their rifles are always a lot of fun for a reasonable price. The BLR ’81 is a compact and user-friendly rack-and-pinion lever-action rifle that is carbine-length and cranks out quite the shot.

They can chamber a range of hard-hitting ammo from the 270 WSM to the 358 Win. It features an aluminum alloy stock, a detachable four-round box magazine with a fast release and a rotary bolt locking system.

It’s ideal for mountaineers and woodsman by virtue of the fact that it’s a mere 7 ¾ lbs and 40” long with mount and scope. The fast-loading mag makes for quick follow-up shots. At a retail price of $900, it’s slightly more expensive than the Stalker, but it’s every bit as exceptional. Well worth the price for the durability and versatility it provides.

Kimber Model 84M Classic

Another bolt-action hunting rifle, the 84M weigh just 5.5 lbs and sport handsome steel or stainless steel barrels. Kimber’s 22” barrel makes them unique among most Model 84Ms.

They commonly feature trigger crowns, match grade barrels and a bolt with a Mauser claw extractor. The adjustable trigger and Pachmayr Decelerator recoil pad are just two of the things that makes it an unbeatable option when it comes to elk hunting rifles.

The average retail price is around $1,225 which places it firmly within the mid-range of affordable hunting rifles.

Marlin Model 338 MXLR

Ideal for timber and brush alike, this lever-action rifle offers a flat trajectory and pinpoint accuracy. With a 24” stainless steel barrel, Ballard rifling, hammer block safety and a fluted bolt, the MXLR is a top of the line machine that holds a 5-round magazine that makes it a viable choice when it comes to game hunting.

It’s got semi-buckhorn iron sights, a trigger guard plate and a laminated hardwood stock with deluxe recoil pad. I’ve tested this one out myself and have found it to be a boss when it comes to long-range precision.

The $930 retail price places it securely in mid-range and is available for layaway gun financing.

Marlin Model 1895G Guide Gun

This big bore lever-action rifle is considered my many to be the strongest lever-action in history. It can be stored virtually anywhere thanks to its compact design.

The Ballard-style rifling carves six deep and wide grooves that aid in improving accuracy. The stubby 18 ½” barrel makes it one of the shortest and lightest hunting rifles on the market.

Paired with Garrett Cartridges’ fire-breathing custom loads, the 1895G is a veritable force to be reckoned with. And while it works rather well with iron sights, the level of accuracy it provides is perfectly suited to a low-powered scope.

Cabela’s currently has offers on this model starting at $629.99.

Remington Model 673 Guide Rifle

The 673 is yet another bolt-action hunting rifle that packs a wallop. My personal favorite is the one that’s chambered for the .350 Remington mag because it offers superior shootability to others.

With a Leopold quick release base and rings, and a 22” barrel, it’s a lot of gun compared to most of the rifles on my list. In fact, it kicks pretty hard compared to the others which may be off-putting to some. But it’s definitely a well-made firearm with a rather unconventional look.

At 7 ¾ lbs, it’s not the lightest hunting rifle around, but it’s not overly heavy or cumbersome in any way either. All in all, it’s a worthy option, especially since Remington stopped making them in 2004 so there are plenty of gun owners selling their used Model 673s online.

Ruger No. 1S Medium Sporter

A single-shot model, Ruger’s No. 1S Medium Sporter is not the right gun for continuous shooting, but it’s tailored to the disciplined, methodical hunter who’s a skilled Marksman.

The front sling swivel is sited forward on the barrel, causing the rifle to ride low on your shoulder. But the receiver is so short that it’s almost identical to the Marlin, making it a compact and easily transportable in a rifle bag.

For the more frugal gun owner, this might not be the best choice on my list as it retails for around $1,199.99 and doesn’t exactly hold up to other rifles in that price bracket, but it remains a worthy option if you have money to burn and you want a solid single-shot rifle with dead-on accuracy. Keep an eye out for deals in any major online gun store and you could find great seasonal discounts.

Weatherby Mark V Deluxe

With a .300 Weatherby mag and a beautiful claro walnut design, the Mark V Deluxe is something to behold. Not only is it a top of the line weapon, but it’s the perfect display piece for proud collectors with a bit more bank than others.

At $1,399.99, it’s a luxury rifle but one that won’t let you down when you’re out in the thick of it. Simply a choice rifle all around.

Weatherby Vanguard Deluxe

Like the Mark V Deluxe, this Weatherby rifle is unmatched for the sheer beauty of its wood design. It’s got a classy black finish and exceptional bolt action, chambering .270 Win rounds and offering no less than three safety positions.

Like Remington’s Model 673, it’s a bit heavier than some of the others on the list, but it’s still a fairly lightweight and compact rifle for hunting, and it’s got an adjustable trigger which is attractive to most game hunters.

Cabela’s has Weatherby VGDs with modular chassis for $1,199.99.

Winchester M70 Super Grade

This finely checkered, deeply-blued steel rifle has a maple finish that makes it another worthy display piece. In terms of hunting, it lives up to its name by offering above-grade accuracy.

Chambered with .308 Win rounds, it’s another stylish and superb choice for those looking to bag some deer or ward off a grizzly.

Conclusion

There you have it, my full list of the five best hunting rifles for hunting elk. Good luck making your selection. I know you’ll be in good hands with any one of them. Happy hunting.