Survival Water From Your Hot Water Heater

Image credit: https://www.askaprepper.com/survival-water-from-your-hot-water-heater/

In the video I posted the other day about 7 steps for emergency water preparation, I don’t recall it saying anything about how to get water out of the water heater. The following post covers that crucial knowledge in detail…

Probably the first thing any of us will notice in a post-disaster scenario is the lack of electrical power. The second thing we will most likely notice is that there isn’t any water. We’ll go to the sink, expecting the water to come out of the faucet, like it always does, and nothing will happen. For many, that will be the moment they wake up and realize that the brown stuff really has hit the rotary air movement device.

Water is one of our top survival priorities, beaten out only by the ability to maintain our core body temperature. Yet it is often overlooked in our day-to-day lives. We are so accustomed to having water at our fingertips, that most people don’t have any idea where to get water, other than bottled water, in the case of an emergency which shuts down the city water.

Yet most of us have a number of water supplies readily available, within walking distance of our homes. We also have clean water in our homes, ready for our use. All we have to do is find a way to access it…

Read the full article here

100 Best Grocery Store Foods to Stockpile

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I’ve long been a believer that you MUST have your food storage squared away before a disaster hits because you simply won’t get much done if your mind is always focused on being hungry for lack of food.

That said, there are certainly plenty of other areas of survival to figure out too, but having your food storage done is a great start.

I should point out that I agree with most of the list presented in the following article. There are, however, a few items that I wouldn’t get carried away with stockpiling (at least not for any sort of long term storage) specifically some of the snack foods, such as cookies, pickles (yeah, it’s listed under snacks) and popcorn, to name a few.

Really, anything that would need refrigerated after being opened (such as the pickles) or that won’t last long (e.g., the cookies and popcorn) shouldn’t be at the top of your list, if included at all.

Instead, focus on the many canned foods (beans, fruits, vegetables, meats, etc.), mixes (e.g., pancake mix), drinks (to keep your taste-buds entertained), and higher carb foods (pastas, cereals) to start with. Everything else should follow after they’re squared away.

Here’s the beginning of the article for the top 100 foods to stockpile…

Disasters can and do strike without warning, and when they strike, most of the population is vastly underprepared. Truth be told, the vast majority of people aren’t prepared at all, and hardly anyone has enough survival food to last them through the month.

It’s for this reason that when a disaster occurs, hoards of people will swarm the grocery stores and supermarkets in order to get as much food as they possibly can. You could end up being one of those people if you don’t start preparing right now.

So take advantage of the comparatively small crowds and short lines you can find at grocery stores during the good times, because there could come a time when going to the store is like something out of a disaster movie.

This article will cover the primary criteria to follow when selecting grocery store foods that you want to store for survival. We’ll also list some specific foods you should consider getting, and we’ll share some tips on how to properly store all this food so it doesn’t go bad.

Criteria
There are many criteria that you will want to keep in mind when stockpiling food for survival, including but not limited to each of the following, presented in alphabetical order…

Read the full article here

Easy DIY Water Filter

With a little ingenuity and a few parts (of about $30 or less) you can build your own SHTF DIY water filter which can be reused over and over again.

You only need an inexpensive hand pump, activated carbon, window screen material (or something similar), a small piece of PVC pipe, as well as some appropriate fittings and tubing to round out the build.

Of course, this water filter should ONLY ever be used as a last resort and you really should attempt to boil any collected water to ensure it’s safe to consume. This filter, therefore, should be considered as a quality pre-filter before final treatment…

GoSun Sport Portable Solar Cooker

I used to love to cook meals with my All American Sun Oven (like this one) and would post about it almost weekly for quite a while. Sadly, we moved to the Pacific Northwest and, well… those tall trees don’t make for advantageous solar cooking conditions, lol. Maybe one of these days I’ll dust it off again.

Anyway, that’s where a truly portable solar cooker, such as this GoSun Sport, would be a perfect fit. (I can attest that lugging my bulky sun oven around wasn’t fun by any means.)

And, while the price tag seemed a bit high at first, when I realized all that you could do with the GoSun Sport via the video below and recognizing how portable this particular sun oven truly is, then the GoSun Sport ProPack is actually quite reasonably priced.

Plus, the ProPack contains everything you need to cook and boil water while on the go, for in your car, at home, and so much more. If you don’t yet have a solar cooker then this one would be a good choice…

 

3 Ways to Preserve Food WITHOUT Canning

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Occasionally, I rant about how much I despise canning foods… it’s always been a pain, in my opinion, and quite messy. That said, I know it can be a great way to put a lot of food if you’re willing to do so, and I’m just not THAT willing, lol.

Fortunately, there are plenty of other ways to stockpile food without refrigeration or canning, and the following article discusses three of them: fermentation, dry curing (meats), and dehydrating.

Personally, I’ve gotten into fermentation in the past few years and, for the most part, it’s really easy to do. I’ve only done a bit of curing and I used to do a lot of dehydrating, though, I’ve slowed on that once I really discovered freeze-dried foods.

Regardless, they’ll all great ways to preserve many healthy foods for the long term and I would strongly encourage you to try you hand at one or more of these methods if you’ve never done so.

Here’s the first part of the article:

“Canned food is so prevalent today that it’s hard to imagine life without it. When you have extra produce that you want to preserve, most people will tell you to can it.

But, what happens when you don’t have the equipment you need for proper canning? What if you run out of flat lids and can’t go to the store for more? Or if you can’t start a fire and keep it going long enough to properly heat and process your jars?

Depending on what happens, canning extra food may not always be possible. You need some alternatives.

Canning was thought to be invented by Nicolas Appert back in 1809, when he was looking for a way to preserve food for the French military. The invention of the mason jar in 1858 helped spread canning’s popularity, as did other inventions throughout history.

But prior to these events, people preserved food without canning. They knew they had to grow or harvest enough food each growing season to last the winter. Their very survival depended on putting up food that they could safely eat months later…”

Read the full article here

What you May NOT know About Preserving Eggs

I did this experiment myself years ago now and, surprisingly, it worked out rather well, even after four months of only being preserved with mineral oil.

In the video she says the coated eggs can last up to nine months, I’ve seen others say a year, and my experiment lasted 18 weeks because that’s how many eggs I had to experiment with. 🙂

Anyway, she offers some additional valuable tips that I wish I knew when I tried my own hand at this, though I do disagree a bit about not using store-bought eggs because my experiments showed there was a clear difference between the control eggs (those that were left uncoated) and those that did get coated with mineral oil after several weeks, if I remember right.

Here’s the video…

25 Uses for The WaterBrick, Besides Storing Water

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The WaterBrick is a very good way to store water for emergency preparedness, especially for those with limited storage space. And, while I don’t use them personally (I prefer to use 55-gallon drums and other transportable containers) small water storage solutions like the WaterBrick do have their place.

The only major problem is that they’re a relatively expensive solution if it’s your primary option. But, if you can afford them, they’re very durable and quite useful as you’ll see. The thing is that it never really occurred to me to use them for anything but storing water. Read on to find out how useful the WaterBrick can truly be besides for storing water:

“Never has emergency water storage been so important to me as when Hurricane Harvey left my town flooded with 8 feet of dirty river water. In the hours and days that followed, families were scrambling for drinking water of any kind. Thankfully, our home had been spared, so we spent the following days delivering cases of water to families busily mucking out their homes…”

Read the full article here (including the 25 uses)