$5 Faraday Cage How To Guide

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Have you always wanted a Faraday Cage to protect your sensitive electronics from an EMP, but were afraid of the cost? Well, consider this idea on making your own Faraday cage for about $5 each. And the best part: you can make several of these with the supplies you’ll need! Here’s how…

“Although the EMP literature is scarce, and often contradictory, I found a “recipe” for a Faraday cage that should withhold both types of EMPs, whether natural or man-made. Based on my own research, I’m pretty sure this will work better than a microwave, a galvanized trash can, or some of the other solutions you can find online.

The idea is simple: wrap your devices in alternating layers of insulating and conductive material, then put everything inside a thick ammo box.

Aluminum foil is cheap, you can find cardboard around the house for free, duct tape and packaging tape are also dirt-cheap, so you can make a cheap Faraday cage for less than $5. Now you will spend more than $5 for these supplies, but keep in mind you’ll be able to make several cages for this amount of money. This doesn’t include the ammo can, which you also probably have in your garage…”

Read the full article here

Passive Solar Heating Panels

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This article on the Zen of Passive Solar Heating Panel Design is a neat write-up on how to make walls that can be used to gather the power of the sun to heat your home or, in this case, a workshop.

The author clearly took this project very seriously, going so far as to angle fins to absorb the most energy of these solar panels. In fact, the author states that he can maintain the internal temperature of the shop at 65 degrees Fahrenheit when the outside temperature is about -20 degrees.. what a difference!

Here’s the beginning of the article (originally found here)…

“A solar heating panel is not just a box with a glass front, a black interior, and a pair of openings in the back. Any fool can build such a box – and many have, but very few have managed to heat an entire building with the result.

You already knew that, of course, or you wouldn’t be reading this. I mention it only because you may not have known that you knew, and because I think it’s an important starting point for our discussion.

When I decided to seriously tackle the design of a solar heating panel, I listed seven requirements for a successful design:

Passive operation
The panel must operate efficiently using only the thermal energy it captures – independent of all other energy sources.
Diurnal operation
The panel must deliver heat efficiently during the day, and not lose more than an absolute minimum of heat when there is insuficient sunshine to provide any deliverable heat.
Season-dependent heating
The panel must deliver maximum heat during winter, and a minimum in summer.
Maximum reliability
The panel must have no moving parts to wear out or fail, and must operate dependably in untended situations.
Long service life
The panel should last at least as long as the structure it heats.
Minimum maintenance
The panel should operate at full efficiency for extended periods of time without needing servicing.
Low-cost
The panel must provide the fastest payback when compared to all other heating methods, and must incur no expense after purchase and installation.

My attitude was that I would take as long as needed to get the job done – and that it would cost whatever it cost. There was the possibility that I might run out of resources without achieving recognizable success, but the possible benefits of success seemed to far outweigh the risk of failure…”

Read the full article here

Rocket Stove Fuel Alternatives

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If you’re “into” survival at all then you’re likely very familiar with rocket stoves… they’re awesome! And they can be fashioned out of all sorts of items, from sheet metal and tin cans to masonry bricks and even earthen materials.

The thing is that I’ve ALWAYS used sticks and twigs to fuel them; however, as the following post explains: “…when a hurricane brushes by my coast and dumps 4-10 inches of rain, there are no dry branches or twigs to gather, light and cook dinner with!”

Clearly, you’ll need an alternative rocket fuel in that case. Here’s a few ideas…

A rocket stove can burn just about anything, including your furniture if need be!

Like any cooking appliance, it needs fuel of some sort. The Rocket Stove is no exception. For me, when a hurricane brushes by my coast and dumps 4-10 inches of rain, there are no dry branches or twigs to gather, light and cook dinner with! I found it difficult to long-term store dry twigs and small branches for its’ fuel, until this week. I found that the Preppers favorite long-term storage container, the 5-gallon bucket, works perfectly!

Wood Fuel for the Rocket Stove:

Here are two buckets, one has split wood in it (about ½ to ¾ inch square by 12-13 inches long) ready to use. The other bucket has scrap 2×4’s and 2×6’s in it, I had this wood on my fireplace wood pile and because of rains, it is too wet to easily split with a hand ax so I’ll get to it in a couple weeks. The nice thing about using 5-gallon bucket for the wood storage is just snap a lid on it and it is neat, dry, bug-free, and clean in your closet or pantry storage…”

Read the full article here

The Grid-Down MultiMachine 10-in-1 All-Purpose Machine Tool

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Have you ever heard of the MultiMachine before? I hadn’t until I read this article earlier this morning.

Apparently, it’s a DIY open source project intended for developing countries “…that can be built by a semi-skilled mechanic with just common hand tools… electricity can be replaced with ‘elbow grease’ and the necessary material can come from discarded vehicle parts.”

That sounds interesting and promising.

According to the aforementioned website, this off-grid machine tool can be used to:

  • build and repair irrigation pumps and farm implements
  • make and repair water pumps and water-well drilling rigs
  • build steel-rolling-and-bending machines for making cook stoves
  • make cart axles and rebuild vehicle parts

…and more.

Like I said, the plans are all open source and can be downloaded as a PDF file or viewed as an HTML document, if you prefer.

47 Easy DIY Survival Projects $0.99 Countdown Deal About to Expire

If you haven’t yet had a chance to grab my latest book, 47 Easy DIY Survival Projects, then now is the time to do so because I’m currently running a $0.99 Kindle countdown deal, but it’s about to expire within the next 40 hours as of this writing… which means you need to act NOW if you want to have your own copy before the deal is over.

Thus far folks like you seem to be enjoying the book quite a bit and, truth be told, I had a bunch of fun writing it. 🙂

Anyway, here’s what’s covered inside…

  • 8 General Survival Projects (create an emergency binder, document your possessions, prepare your pets, and more)
  • 5 DIY Water Projects (how to store water quickly and properly treat it so you don’t get sick)
  • 8 DIY Food Projects (know how to NOT get sick when the power goes out, make homemade MREs, boost vitamin yields of grains, etc.)
  • 5 DIY Cooking Projects (use a thermos to cook with, build a 30-second rocket stove, vegetable can stove, and more)
  • 7 DIY Safety and Security Projects (which NOAA radio to buy, develop a fire escape plan, how to earthquake “proof” shelving, etc.)
  • 4 DIY Hygiene Projects (homemade cleaners, rodent traps, makeshift toilets)
  • 5 “Get Ready to Evacuate” Projects (how to get your bedside ready, pocket survival kits, bug out bag, and more)
  • 5 Miscellaneous Projects (stockpiling cash, makeshift lamps, etc.)

If you’re at all interested in DIY projects or if you want dozens of easy solutions to get yourself better prepared starting today, grab the book now at a great price while you still can.

Have a wonderful rest of the day.

 

100% Solar Off Grid House Expert

It’s interesting to hear about how this guy put together a 100% solar setup that runs everything electric in his house–I assume it’s a rather small house–including all appliances such as an electric stove, water heater and even split air conditioning.

Apparently, he did it all for around $14K which, according to him, works out to about $100 per month over the life of the system. That’s not bad if you can afford the up-front investment.

At about 3:27 he mentions a solar basics course for $30 which sounded like he said DIYHomesteadProjects.com and I think this is the course here, if you’re interested…

How to Make a Faraday Cage in 4 Easy Steps

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“If you’ve been in the prepper world for long, you’ve probably read some horrifying books about what can happen after a disaster called an EMP. And if you’ve done that, you know you need to protect vulnerable electronics. Today, we’ll talk about how to make a Faraday cage to do just that. Don’t worry – you won’t need a degree in physics to do this successfully.

First, let’s start off with a few important things to know.

What is an EMP?

EMP is short for electromagnetic pulse. It is a short burst of electromagnetic radiation that could come if a nuclear detonation occurred at very high altitude above us.

When a nuclear explosion occurs in space above a target, three types of electromagnetic pulses follow: E1, E2, and E3. An E1 pulse involves high-energy gamma rays colliding with air molecules nearly 20 miles above, then raining down electrons that get pulled in by Earth’s natural magnetic field. An E2 pulse comes from high-energy neutrons that get fired in every direction, and an E3 pulse occurs due to the size of the nuclear fireball itself affecting the Earth’s magnetic field. As nuclear physicist Dr. Yousaf Butt explains, these pulses affect everything in line of sight of the nuclear blast. For example, a blast at 60 miles up can affect a 700-mile radius on Earth…”

Read the full article here